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Old 04-27-2012, 04:03 PM   #1
hopsalot
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It is unfortunate that American Craft Breweries are slowly moving towards centrifuges, the idea behind the Craft Brew movement in America was not to lasso in BMC drinkers with looks but taste and creativity. Vanity has no place here. IMO the filter is one thing but the centrifuge has no place in the Craft Brew Movement. I am no snob, a nerd I am, but no snob, but I genuinely feel that the focus on clarity of beer is hurting the general effort of Craft Beer.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:13 PM   #2
BeerDoctor5
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I disagree. I don't think using a centrifuge takes anything away from the craft beer industry. If I had a centrifuge I'd probably use it. Craft beer is all about flavor and creativity IMO.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:21 PM   #3
broadbill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hopsalot View Post
It is unfortunate that American Craft Breweries are slowly moving towards centrifuges, the idea behind the Craft Brew movement in America was not to lasso in BMC drinkers with looks but taste and creativity. Vanity has no place here. IMO the filter is one thing but the centrifuge has no place in the Craft Brew Movement. I am no snob, a nerd I am, but no snob, but I genuinely feel that the focus on clarity of beer is hurting the general effort of Craft Beer.
What's the logic here?

A. BMC is bad beer.
B. BMC uses centrifuges
C. Any brewery that uses centrifuges makes bad beer.

It could just as easily be:
A. BMC is bad beer.
C. BMC uses yeast.
C. Any brewery that uses yeast makes bad beer.

 
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:34 PM   #4
hopsalot
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BMC is more of a broad term in this discussion. I personally don’t think a brewery needs to have crystal clear beer to sell their product. I do not think that the use of a centrifuge will produce bad beer; I do think it is unnecessary though. If you say that a centrifuge does not affect the flavor we can agree to disagree. I understand that clear beer is more approachable therefore it markets better. My wish is that an unfiltered beer would market just as well as a filtered or centrifuged beer.
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Old 04-27-2012, 04:56 PM   #5
hopsalot
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Originally Posted by broadbill View Post
What's the logic here?
C. Any brewery that uses yeast makes bad beer.
I am not sure how you came to that conclusion; my original statement was condoning suspended yeast. Additionally I do not know what filtering methods BMC employs. What I do know is that the application of centrifuging is growing in American Craft Breweries
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:06 PM   #6
JJL
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I don't really see why either filtering or centrifuging in general are bad things. You are assuming that it somehow takes away from the quality of the finished beer in some way. The bottom line is that brewing on a commercial level is about consistency and profit. It takes a ton of time and space to let beer sit around and clarify on its own. And bottle conditioning beer takes additional time and space. Typically, filtering/centrifuging is done to either clarify beer and/or control yeast levels, thus saving time and cost and increasing consistency. I'd bet that there are beers you really like that are run through a centrifuge and you don't even know it. In fact, I even know one brewery in particular that makes really good beer that uses a centrifuge and then bottle conditions their beer afterwards.

 
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:25 PM   #7
broadbill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hopsalot View Post
I am not sure how you came to that conclusion; my original statement was condoning suspended yeast. Additionally I do not know what filtering methods BMC employs. What I do know is that the application of centrifuging is growing in American Craft Breweries
It's reductio ad absurdum....to show that because BMC does something, doesn't make it bad (which was implied by the sounds of your OP).

 
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:35 PM   #8
hopsalot
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I agree with all of your posts, I know of many breweries that use a centrifuge and the beer is awesome. Maybe my original point was not portrayed clearly or I was too zealous. I wish clarity of beer was not so valued by the average consumer. I understand the economics behind a centrifuge. To some, a beer that is not clear is a beer that is not well made. That is all.

Quote:
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It's reductio ad absurdum.....
nice name drop partner
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:49 PM   #9
dbhokie
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I love to cook. I have a lot of friends that love to eat what I cook. Constantly I hear things like "I can't stand thyme". I really don't like much garlic, I hate onions, etc. They love my food though, most of it tends to have thyme, garlic, and onions. They just don't know it. People are consumed with pre-conceived notions based on something or other. It is what it is. In European countries, beer has to a much larger degree been unfiltered, but they didn't have a prohibition that cleared out all the micro-breweries in the whole country. Then when you come back from prohibition, they market. Unless it's dark, people can see haziness, and when you grow up in a germaphobic world, where people freak out when Chicken isn't dried to a crisp when cooked, that's what you end up with. As a producer, you have to stay in business, if you can make your product more appealing to a market segment without affecting quality, you do it. Regardless of how much such things may be based on superstition. Lately when I have been selling hot sauce, I have realized, "yeah I think I have a great tasting gourmet product, however, in truth, when you are selling it, appearance, marketability is what drives the sale." You can have a crap product with good marketability, and like a placebo, people will convince themselves its good. You have a great product with great marketability, well that's just better.

Never heard a latin termed logical fallacy called a name-drop. heh.
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:13 PM   #10
broadbill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hopsalot View Post

nice name drop partner
I assumed the person with the latin phrase in his signature their logical fallacies...

 
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