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Old 04-04-2013, 11:39 AM   #111
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Originally Posted by bellmtbbq View Post
they know the judges judging sour beer are full of crap
I judged sours at this year's Drunk Monk

Seriously, if you really think that, get in the game instead of kvetching on the sidelines. If you're not credentialed, do the work to get credentialed and start judging.
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:19 PM   #112
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Thanks for all the recent feedback guys! Yes, I do love to keep it simple. I had some club members over for a brew day two months ago and the general remark about my practices/brewery was "Why am I not doing it like this? This is so simple." I'm not saying that I'm perfect or that I'm better. I'm just saying I like to arrive at the same place by going the shorter distance.

All that being said, this simple little recipe has been blessed with a few more awards.

In chronological order:
KC Bier Meisters Comp:
2nd Sours with the Gueuze
3rd Sours with the remaining carboy of the first batch

IBU Open:
2nd Sours with the Gueuze

A comp that shall not be named because the results haven't been posted:
3rd Sours with the first bottling of this recipe

Overall, I'm surprised how well the gueuze is doing given that it's barely carbonated (I tried the traditional method of using a young lambic to carbonate the blend - fail). I will probably try to dose it with champagne yeast and see what happens to a few bottles. If I do, I'll post back with the results.

Cheers guys!
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Old 04-11-2013, 10:27 PM   #113
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I've mentioned before that I made two 5 gallon batches 1.5 months apart. When I fermented the first batch in the primary, it had bubbles coming out of the airlock every 12 seconds after a month and a half. I found that pretty crazy. So when I made my second batch I was even more surprised to see that it had airlock activity for one day and haven't seen it do it since. Probably has to do with overpitching but I'm curious to see what the taste difference is in the end.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:34 AM   #114
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I ended up brewing the base beer today. I mashed 9# pils & 9# wheat at 154F. My intention was to KISS with extract, but at last minute LHBS prices that woulda cost me $65 for 12# of DME so instead I bought 2x50# sacks of grain for $95 and did a mash.

Used my march pump for the first time, and in the excitement forgot the 8oz of Malto-dextrine powder. Should I boil it in water, cool & add it to the ferment? Or does it not matter?

Doing initial ferment with US-05, then pitching WLP Sour Belgian I plus the dregs of DFM, Tilquin, and De Proef sours (can't get Cantillon, RR, or JP here). Any suggestions?
Yes you could just boil, cool and add to the primary. That will work out and you could even rack onto it in the secondary. It's there to provide more for the bugs to chew on after the sacc in the blend (or initial ferment in your case) eats up the easier to access fermentables. The bugs can eat what the sacc yeast cannot.

Personally, I'd just wait until racking but I think either would work just fine.
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Old 04-12-2013, 02:12 PM   #115
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Yes you could just boil, cool and add to the primary. That will work out and you could even rack onto it in the secondary. It's there to provide more for the bugs to chew on after the sacc in the blend (or initial ferment in your case) eats up the easier to access fermentables. The bugs can eat what the sacc yeast cannot.

Personally, I'd just wait until racking but I think either would work just fine.
Additional data point: I've done both with good results.
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Old 04-22-2013, 02:56 AM   #116
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Another winner.

The first bottling of this recipe received 2nd in Sours at the Garage Brewer's Champion of the Pint. Interestingly, the judges both commented that it seemed young and to enter it next year. That was the 'reason' that it only got 3rd BOS and 1st in Sours at the same comp last year.

I wonder what makes a lambic "older"? Besides time, obviously.
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Old 04-22-2013, 11:50 PM   #117
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Another winner.

The first bottling of this recipe received 2nd in Sours at the Garage Brewer's Champion of the Pint. Interestingly, the judges both commented that it seemed young and to enter it next year. That was the 'reason' that it only got 3rd BOS and 1st in Sours at the same comp last year.

I wonder what makes a lambic "older"? Besides time, obviously.
Probably because judges themselves don't know what old vs young tastes like, and they are just looking for something to say. Chances are good that entries in this category are too young, so it's probably a common comment. I have no idea myself how to compare age.
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:04 AM   #118
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I wonder what makes a lambic "older"? Besides time, obviously.
It's be great to see if the next time your receive a comment like that for them to try and put a finger on what aspect they think makes it seem young. Perhaps is just one ingredient that is common in other lambics that isn't included in this one that would give it that last leg up. I'd be very interested in what you can find out!

I can't wait for this to be in bottles.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:52 AM   #119
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Interesting, I would say at 2.5 years old that it would be fairly "old" tasting at this point. Although, I know some people age lambics 3-5 years. Although, like the other poster said, I think entering young beers in this category is common, so it may just be them not really knowing the difference between a young and old entry. Another factor could be where you were in the flight. This category can get hard to judge after a few because the sourness starts to fatigue the palette. It should say what position you were in the flight on your feedback somewhere (well, hopefully they did).
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Old 04-23-2013, 01:18 PM   #120
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I haven't tasted your beer (unfortunately) and I haven't seen the judges comments but typically "old" and "young" refer to unblended lambics, or perhaps your gueuze has a little more of the younger beer added that then judges thing it needs (very subjective). But that is the blender's prerogative.
Young lambics have more enteric bacteria flavor (those are the oxygen using bacteria so they dye off pretty quick) but it gives a slight damp kitchen sponge aroma. Also younger straight lambics tend to be a bit sharper in tartness without much more depth. Bright and tasty but they don't have the depth you start to see as the Brett. characters (and other beasties) start to grow. Anything from white cheese rind to grapefruit pith to horsey can all be delicious characteristics of more age. It is possible that carbonation (if you had any?) can enhance that tartness and mask some of the more subtle flavors that are in there, as well as if they are served too cold (which is common and beer judging as all beers from light lagers to lambics go in the same cooler), and when a beer is opened it often takes about 10 min. or more to open up and really expose those flavors and that is time a beer judge just doesn't have.

All that being said I wouldn't be surprised if "too young" just means I don't get much depth of character, or my tongue is numb from drinking sour beers for 4 hours straight.
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