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Old 04-16-2012, 04:15 AM   #11
BlakeL
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There seemed to be a lot of sediment at the bottom of the carboy when I transferred the wort. Is this normal? It looked like it could have been the hops but was hard to tell. It seems to be condensing at the bottom the longer it sits.



 
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:25 AM   #12
frazier
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Gravity works in mysterious ways. All perfectly normal - hop sludge, dormant yeast, and proteins from the grains, are all heavier than water. You want this to happen.


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Old 04-16-2012, 04:33 AM   #13
Ply318ci
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That exact kit was my first home brew I ever made I loved it. Not as hoppy as you would expect for a IPA but still delicious. Also if you follow their method of brewing, like making oatmeal, you don't get a high efficiency it is more in the 60% range. I did it that way for most of my brews and recently switched to mash tun and from what I have read should be better. All in all I love my Brooklyn brewshop kit and still use it as I am a small scale brewer as well. Have fun.

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:34 AM   #14
Dotmo
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Mar 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlakeL View Post
There seemed to be a lot of sediment at the bottom of the carboy when I transferred the wort. Is this normal? It looked like it could have been the hops but was hard to tell. It seems to be condensing at the bottom the longer it sits.
Yup. All normal! Same thing happened when I brewed my first Brooklyn kit. Its hops/fine particulate on the bottom, then the lighter stuff on top of that is some of the yeast that dropped from suspension ("yeast cake"). When I cool my wort, I have the boil pot leaning on a bowl turned upside-down in the ice bath. This puts the pot on an angle and helps a lot of the junk settle into the corner. I then siphon it into my primary being careful to take as little of that gunky stuff as possible. You will still get some, but most of it I can leave behind.

What kind of strainer did you use to remove the spent grain from the wort before the boil? I used a regular stainless steel kitchen strainer which let a lot of the small stuff through. My first batch actually looked exactly like yours does in the fermenting picture you posted, and it turned out great. Was it? Not sure, but I made it, and thats what counts until you get the process down and can really refine your technique!

Brew on!

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 05:20 AM   #15
wolfareno
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ply318ci View Post
That exact kit was my first home brew I ever made I loved it. Not as hoppy as you would expect for a IPA but still delicious. Also if you follow their method of brewing, like making oatmeal, you don't get a high efficiency it is more in the 60% range. I did it that way for most of my brews and recently switched to mash tun and from what I have read should be better. All in all I love my Brooklyn brewshop kit and still use it as I am a small scale brewer as well. Have fun.
My sister bought me Brooklyn's recipe book, and I'm going to brew some of their recipes in 4 gal batches when I get home using a BIAB method. My kettle is only 7.5 gal, but I think that will be enough for a no-sparge (hence only 4 gal batch size). I've never done AG, but I'm hoping this method will yield some decent efficiency. I plan on using Beersmith to scale the recipe and plan for about 70% efficiency. I'll keep some DME on hand in case I miss

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 10:47 AM   #16
BlakeL
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Apr 2012
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Thanks for all the reassuring words guys. I checked the jug this morning and I'm getting a ton of bubbles from the tubbing, which is exciting.

Dotmo, I was using a normal kitchen strainer for the grains and when I transferred the wort to the jug. What would be the best type of strainer to use? My wife said cheese cloth might have been better.

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 11:47 AM   #17
BlakeL
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I have another questions. When I go to bottle is there any special way so I don't get all that sediment?

When I do another batch I'll defiantly make a mash ton out of a cooler since that will make the process much easier.

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 12:37 PM   #18
Ply318ci
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Your going to get some that is what happens in all homebrew the best way I found to get as little as possible is to cold crash it. This means stick it in the fridge for 3-5 days. You might want to remove the airlock since the pressure change from the beer getting that cold will suck in the sanitizer. I just wrap the top in aluminum foil. If you look up gelatin finnings that can help some but I have noticed that cold crashing seems to do the trick. It packs all the trub tightly at the bottom allowing you to siphon with minimum sediment. Then before you drink them out the bottles in the fridge for a few days and the se thing happens on a smaller scale. Here is a picture of my brother doing that with a stout he made to help clear up any confusion.
Click image for larger version

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Old 04-16-2012, 12:46 PM   #19
BlakeL
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You do this at the end of fermentation, before bottling?

 
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:11 PM   #20
Ply318ci
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Yeah wait at least two weeks after you brew then cold crash three weeks is even better.



 
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