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Old 04-09-2012, 10:24 PM   #1
jf31276
 
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was wondering if it is a no no to do this i have on tap now a esb that is milky and tastes a little yeasty. it is already carbed up so i don't know it it would be ok to transfer filter it to another keg

 
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Old 04-10-2012, 03:08 AM   #2
badbrew
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I believe it is o.k. if you drop the pressure down to 2 psi and purge the gas in the keg first. The key is really slow.

If foaming is a big concern you may try this: gas up the empty keg first and then let it hang for a minute, and then purge the air. Then purge, and connect the full keg to the empty without the gas line hooked up. It should start transferring on it's own in a little while. If you hang up the relief valve on the empty, it will transfer really slow, maybe an hour or three or longer.

 
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:18 PM   #3
audger
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., Connecticut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by badbrew View Post
I believe it is o.k. if you drop the pressure down to 2 psi and purge the gas in the keg first. The key is really slow.

If foaming is a big concern you may try this: gas up the empty keg first and then let it hang for a minute, and then purge the air. Then purge, and connect the full keg to the empty without the gas line hooked up. It should start transferring on it's own in a little while. If you hang up the relief valve on the empty, it will transfer really slow, maybe an hour or three or longer.
no, to prevent foaming you want to transfer under pressure. instead of having your keg of beer at 2psi and the empty keg of beer at zero, you want to have your keg of beer at 10psi and the empty keg at 6-8psi. same pressure difference, but it will all be under pressure and keep the CO2 from coming out along the way. making sure everything is cold also helps. if the filter is room temperature, it can cause foaming.

you should also fill the filter and target keg completely with sanitizer and push it out with 6psi of CO2 in order to purge ALL the oxygen. otherwise your beer will pick up quite a bit of O2 in the filter. especially for an ESB, you dont want oxygen.

 
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
jf31276
 
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Thanks audgur those were the steps I was thinking of

 
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:56 PM   #5
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The real question is why is the beer milky...

Did you give it enough time in the fermenter?
Did you use any fining agents?
How long has it sat in the keg?
What type of yeast did you use?

There may be a lesson here that will save you a lot of time, money, effort by preventing this ins the future.

 
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