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Old 04-05-2012, 02:54 PM   #1
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Default 20 amp 240v GFCI outlet?

I just wanted to confirm, there's no such thing (or at least cheap thing) as a 20amp 240V GFCI outlet, right? The 120v ones are obvioulsy not hard to find, but is there a 240v version out there?

Now that I'm going to use a 4500w element isntead of a 5500w, I realized the 4500w at 240v gets me under 20 amps. Running a new 20amp line/wire/outlet would be easier/cheaper than everything that comes with 30amp service. But if there's no reasonably priced GFCI protection at 20amps, I'll just stick with the initial 30amp plan.

I'm guessing it doesn't exist or many people would have already gone that route.....

thanks


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Old 04-05-2012, 03:02 PM   #2
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The other advantage to sizing everything at 20 amps is the cost. There is a significant cost difference between all of the much more common 20 amp equipment and the 30 amp equipment. I am running a 4500 watt element for this reason. I used a 30 amp gfci breaker and fed two 20 amp fuses in my controller so that I would be able to run #12 wire to everything and use 20 amp cord caps and receptacles to keep the cost down.


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Old 04-05-2012, 03:53 PM   #3
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You could use a standard 240V / 20amp breaker and receptacle and an inline GFCI between your heating element and the plug. Not sure of the cost difference between that and the 30 amp solution, but wiring could be easier.




McMaster sells a 2ft 240V/20AMP extension cord for $80 (7348K54).
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:37 PM   #4
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That's cutting it pretty close though isn't it?

In any case, the cheapest way to get GFCI at 240v is an inline spa panel. The upside to that is that you can upgrade to 50 amps of draw without a new GFCI.
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Old 11-27-2012, 01:57 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
The other advantage to sizing everything at 20 amps is the cost. There is a significant cost difference between all of the much more common 20 amp equipment and the 30 amp equipment. I am running a 4500 watt element for this reason. I used a 30 amp gfci breaker and fed two 20 amp fuses in my controller so that I would be able to run #12 wire to everything and use 20 amp cord caps and receptacles to keep the cost down.
I know this is an old thread but I saw this post and thought Id give you a heads up

what you did is illegal, not to code and a fire hazard

for continuous duty you have to a apply a 1.25factor to the current draw for safe operation

at 4500watts/240 = 18.75amps x 1.25 = 23amps so you need the 30amp brearker and the #10 wire, the #12 may get too hot during the long runs and could melt
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Old 11-28-2012, 05:36 PM   #6
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NEC Article 100 states that a continuous load is 3 hours or more. Seeing as I don't do 3 hour boils it's perfectly safe and legal.
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Old 11-28-2012, 06:12 PM   #7
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I like your thinking. Always look for the cheap easy way, then confirm there is no cheap easy way. I'm in the process of doing this for eBIAB.
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:03 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
NEC Article 100 states that a continuous load is 3 hours or more. Seeing as I don't do 3 hour boils it's perfectly safe and legal.
Aside from continuous duty definition

210.19(A), 215.2, and 230.42(A) specify that the conductor has to be able to carry no less than 100% of noncontinous duty load, in your case 30A (chosen breaker), #12 is good up to 90C if THHN your good to 30A,

unfortunately though, for small conductors (10,12,14) NEC 240.4(d) limits #12 to 20A overcurrent max, so connecting #12 to a 30A breaker is a no no
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Old 11-28-2012, 07:33 PM   #9
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Did you not read that I fused down to 20 amps in the controller?
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Old 11-28-2012, 08:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yjfun View Post
Did you not read that I fused down to 20 amps in the controller?
Isn't the issue that you have 12 gauge house wiring with a 30a breaker that is oversized for and won't protect the wiring, as your permanent installation? I would think that would not conform to code. Again, I am not an electrician.


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