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Old 04-05-2012, 01:17 AM   #1
EatWell
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Feb 2012
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Brewing a Russian imperial stout, it's has been bubbling for about three weeks. It looks like it has stalled, and is reading 1.031 and I'm looking to be at 1.018. I have read a couple of threads that I should bring up the temp. and give it a little shake to bring back the yeast to get where I want to be. Should I do this? Any other thoughts to get the FG to where I need to be!

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:54 AM   #2
aidan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EatWell View Post
Brewing a Russian imperial stout, it's has been bubbling for about three weeks. It looks like it has stalled, and is reading 1.031 and I'm looking to be at 1.018. I have read a couple of threads that I should bring up the temp. and give it a little shake to bring back the yeast to get where I want to be. Should I do this? Any other thoughts to get the FG to where I need to be!
Rousing the yeast with some gentle swirling won't hurt, on the other hand vigorous splashing/shaking could introduce oxidation which is not good.

I've posted a similar topic recently regarding an IPA that has finished higher than expected. In my case I've come to the conclusion that it is finished. You are at a much higher SG so it could be a different matter, but I'm assuming you started with a very high OG, so it could be a possibility that it's done fermenting. An FG of 1.030 is within the style guidelines for RIS. 1.018 is the very lowest FG according to the style guide. You'll probably have to post your recipe or more details to get a more accurate assesment.
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:55 AM   #3
drhookmec
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At what temp did you take the 1031 reading?
Did you correct for temperature? It maybe lower then you think.

Rousing the yeast may be exactly what you need to do at this point.
But don't shake the wort just gently swirl it a around a bit to wake up the yeast.
Then move to a warmer place and let it sit another week.

Tim

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:35 AM   #4
cmybeer
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I have a comment on and a question on this topic.

Comment: Depending on what you want 1.03 may not be that bad. I like a nice big full bodied RIS so I tend to shoot a little higher. Do you want the lower gravity for the flavor or for the ABV? How did your sample taste? If you do still want it lower based on taste or ABV concerns swirl it three times a day and raise the temp.

Question: I've been gently swirling for all my big beers and having good success but how can shaking it roughly oxygenate the beer? At that point shouldn't the oxygen be pushed out of the carboy by the fermentation process? And even if it does originate it, isn't that alright if you are still hoping that it drops ten points or more because the yeast will just use that up to keep working?

These are some questions I've always wondered. My yeast knowledge is relatively limited

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:07 AM   #5
gmcastil
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If you are getting consistent gravity readings over a couple of days, then that is it. Once your beer is finished fermenting, nothing you can do is going to fix that. All the stuff that is left behind is unfermentable sugars, so warming it up or shaking it won't do anything. Wait until you get consistent readings, bottle it, and give it some time.

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:23 AM   #6
djfriesen
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Sep 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmybeer View Post
I have a comment on and a question on this topic.

Comment: Depending on what you want 1.03 may not be that bad. I like a nice big full bodied RIS so I tend to shoot a little higher. Do you want the lower gravity for the flavor or for the ABV? How did your sample taste? If you do still want it lower based on taste or ABV concerns swirl it three times a day and raise the temp.

Question: I've been gently swirling for all my big beers and having good success but how can shaking it roughly oxygenate the beer? At that point shouldn't the oxygen be pushed out of the carboy by the fermentation process? And even if it does originate it, isn't that alright if you are still hoping that it drops ten points or more because the yeast will just use that up to keep working?

These are some questions I've always wondered. My yeast knowledge is relatively limited
Pertaining to this, my understanding is that oxygen is used during the reproductive phase in the yeast's life cycle. By the end of fermentation, this process is no longer happening, so oxygen usage is negligible. But I also don't know much of the science behind it.

OP: What was your recipe and process? Some details will help us determine how likely it is to be finished, and maybe give some insight into how to keep future brews from finishing earlier than desired.

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 03:46 PM   #7
EatWell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drhookmec View Post
At what temp did you take the 1031 reading?
Did you correct for temperature? It maybe lower then you think.

Rousing the yeast may be exactly what you need to do at this point.
But don't shake the wort just gently swirl it a around a bit to wake up the yeast.
Then move to a warmer place and let it sit another week.

Tim
OK...Tim, I took the 1031 reading at 64*

 
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Old 04-05-2012, 04:00 PM   #8
EatWell
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Feb 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djfriesen View Post
Pertaining to this, my understanding is that oxygen is used during the reproductive phase in the yeast's life cycle. By the end of fermentation, this process is no longer happening, so oxygen usage is negligible. But I also don't know much of the science behind it.

OP: What was your recipe and process? Some details will help us determine how likely it is to be finished, and maybe give some insight into how to keep future brews from finishing earlier than desired.
Thanks for all your thoughts...Here is the recipe, Partial Brew: 6.6lb Dark LME, 2lbs Dark DME, 8oz Caramel 60L, 8oz Roasted Barley, 8oz Black Patent. 1oz. Bittering hops, .5oz Aroma hops. Yeast(Sachet). Steeped grains at 151* for 40mins. Pitched yeast at 67* and started fermenting on 3/19/12 at 64*. OG was taken at 64* and was 1.078. Used a blow off, and good thing, it went crazy for two weeks! So now I have a gravity reading 4/4/12 at 1.031. Is it over?
Also I should add that I was thinking that I would transfer into secondary and introduce some vanilla and oaked bourbon. If when I transfer should I pick up some of the yeast cake to wake the yeast up in secondary? Let me know! Thanks.mug:

 
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