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Old 04-05-2012, 04:45 AM   #11
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I think the only real question I have that was never asked in the original thread is...

- If one were brewing beer around yeast rinsing (strange, I know), what would be the optimum time to rack to the secondary, yielding the greatest volume of salvagable yeast possible in the primary??

As close to the "end" of vigorous fermentation as possible? 7 days? 10 days?


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Old 04-05-2012, 02:09 PM   #12
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Even if you are brewing around yeast rinsing your first obligation is to make sure the yeast have fully fermented the beer. I'd say as soon as the fermentation is done might be an optimal time to harvest the yeast.
Honestly, I don't think there will be any appreciable increase in viability of the yeast whether you harvested right after fermentation or kept the beer in the primary for the whole time and then harvested.
Harvesting yeast after the beer has been in the primary, for what ever time the beer requires, has worked for many people including John Palmer and Jamil Zainasheff.


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Old 04-23-2012, 04:04 PM   #13
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First off, great thread (and great original thread).

So I want to reuse some yeast from one of my saisons I brewed this spring.

I made a 10% wort solution with 500 ml of water. Pitched the dregs from 2 bottles into the solution. Let it sit about 2.5 days (yeast became active again).

I just swirled up the solution and let the trub settle out. Made a 1 quart starter with 4 oz of DME, and decanted the small solution into the new big one today.

I don't want to use this yeast for another month or two, so I want to wash it.

I know how to wash, the question is just WHEN should I do so? Wait 2-3 days for the starter to get going then wash? I don't want to dilute the yeast too much, and want to harvest 2-3 pints full. Also, how would I have any idea how much yeast i would actually have after washing?

Thanks!
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Old 04-25-2012, 05:59 PM   #14
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All I can tell you is... I would want to plan on letting the yeast separate for 3 to 7 days before decanting the "beer" on top.

We decanted the beer after just one day, because we were in a hurry. We could have gotten twice as much as we did, I'm sure.... had we let it sit for a few more days.
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:56 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southside2234
.. the question is just WHEN should I do so? Wait 2-3 days for the starter to get going then wash?
Also, how would I have any idea how much yeast i would actually have after washing?
1) depends how quickly that particular yeast flocc out.. a lot of factors.. like the poster above me said, longer allows you to gather more yeast.
2) Note #10 or 11 in the OP answered this.. no one here knows. When it is done, you can measure it.

good luck!
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Old 11-10-2012, 08:16 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grndslm View Post
It looks like you may be technically correct...
Which, as we've learned from Bureaucrat 1.0, is the best kind of correct.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:58 PM   #17
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I am interested in starting to wash my yeast but I admit, I haven't taken the time to read thru any of the 140 pages of the original thread this OP was referencing to so forgive me if my answer to my question is in there.

My question involves when to wash my yeast? I watched a video where they said that you should do it when racking from primary to secondary. My question is, what if you don't transfer from primary to secondary? Most of my brews I keep in my fermenter bucket from the time I rack the wort until I rack to my bottling bucket. Will this be OK or would I have to start racking my beer to a secondary vessel if I wanted to start washing my yeast?
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Old 11-11-2012, 01:37 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MMJfan View Post
I am interested in starting to wash my yeast but I admit, I haven't taken the time to read thru any of the 140 pages of the original thread this OP was referencing to so forgive me if my answer to my question is in there.

My question involves when to wash my yeast? I watched a video where they said that you should do it when racking from primary to secondary. My question is, what if you don't transfer from primary to secondary? Most of my brews I keep in my fermenter bucket from the time I rack the wort until I rack to my bottling bucket. Will this be OK or would I have to start racking my beer to a secondary vessel if I wanted to start washing my yeast?
IIRC, if you want to keep your yeast in PRIME / OPTIMUM health for as many generations as possible... you will want to transfer to secondary.

As with anything else brew related, however... there's always somebody who will say that it's possible. I once saw a thread of a guy who used ordinary, rusty 55-gallon steel drums to brew beer in... but I don't think I'd do it myself.

Then again, optimum beer result will be to forgo secondary and keep it in primary as long as possible, primarily to prevent oxidation... which I'm sure you're aware of.

Perhaps the proper answer to your question is actually.... a cheap 15-gallon conical fermenter with yeast catcher???

There must be a reason that the pros use conical fermenters, and your question could very likely be the culmination of their knowledge into a PRIME / OPTIMUM solution. . . . .
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:43 PM   #19
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Old 11-12-2012, 12:23 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grndslm View Post
That is definitely one area I would like to expand on.

What is the best way to separate those "highly flocculating" strands from the trub??

There was actually another thread (only 2 pages long, tho!) dedicated to that subject, but I didn't copy it down. The information in there wasn't very definite, and I wasn't exactly planning on doing this until I got a third of the way through it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brettwasbtd View Post
Not sure, I think the consensus I saw was that you were gonna keep a little trub no matter what and the best plan of attack was to minimize the trub and cold break that goes into the fermenter. Thats if you know you are going to rinse it ahead of time.
I just experience this with a lager yeast. In the second jar, Some white yeast settled at the bottom then trub then cloudy liquid. I poured off the cloudy liquid into another jar and saved it, then discarded the trub and saved the white yeast at the bottom as well and recombined them when I pitched.


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