Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Using tea bags for flavor?
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Old 04-04-2012, 12:57 AM   #1
xgarland77x
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Default Using tea bags for flavor?

I am making a Dogfish Head Aprihop clone and instead of putting apricot purée or extract I was going to try for a tea bag or three of apricot tea to be placed during secondary...

1) Any thoughts as to the best way to get the flavor into the beer... I.e should I brew the tea and dump the liquid into the carboy, throw the tea bags directly in, or some other method not thought of yet?

Thanks in advance, much appreciation!!!


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Old 04-04-2012, 01:35 AM   #2
Alphonso
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For the best apricot flavor, you would want to add apricot extract at bottling to taste.

That said, I like your idea of using tea. Try adding tea bags after flameout, steeping while you chill the wort. Steep according to directions on the tea. As for how much to use, that's gonna be up to you. Maybe someone who has done this can chime in.

Keep us posted as to what you do and how it works. mmmmm . . . teabagging


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Old 04-04-2012, 01:55 AM   #3
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Thanks, haha yea that's why I'm calling it; "T-Bagged Aprihop", I wracked it to secondary sunday morning so my options are limited now but I hear primary fermentation can take a toll on slight flavors as a tea bag would provide... That's why I waited, still would like anyone's opinions that have done anything like this before, I can't be a pioneer...
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Old 04-04-2012, 01:45 PM   #4
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Tea bags secondary? Flavor? Anyone?
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Old 04-04-2012, 01:48 PM   #5
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"I hear primary fermentation can take a toll on slight flavors as a tea bag would provide"

Good call. I guess what I would do is brew up a real strong tea (like 10 teabags in a quart of water) and add that to taste when you bottle.

Alternatively; you could brew up said real strong tea, pull a sample of known volume (say 10 oz of beer - use a finished carbed beer similar to what you made) and add your strong tea mix incrementally (say 1 tsp at a time) until you get the flavor you desire. Then extrapolate the numbers to match the batch you made, and add that volume of strong tea to primary, secondary, bottling bucket . . . .

Alternatively, you could guess and just throw a few tea bags into primary or secondary.

Best part, when you offer these guys up for consumption, you can ask, "Who wants to get TEA-BAGGED!!"
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Old 04-04-2012, 04:11 PM   #6
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yea, I think I'm going to brew up a 1 cup of tea per gallon of beer, loose leaf which is a stronger tea, then throw in say 2-3 tea bags...

I love the idea of telling my friends and family that I just tea bagged their taste buds!!!! they'll get a kick outta that one!!!
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Old 04-04-2012, 09:08 PM   #7
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I took what I figured was around three cups of "strong" "ice tea grade" loose apricot tea (no artificial flavors), this ended up being around 1 1/4 oz. Steeped them @195 degrees F for 2-3 minutes into some drinking water that I had boiled for around 10 minutes. I also took two artificially flavored apricot tea bags and steeped them as the other but into a single cup. I then mixed both into a pot and simmered for around 7-8 minutes.

The mixture was then transferred into a cleaned and sanitized mason jar which was placed into the freezer for a bit to cool. The cooled mixture was added to the secondary directly on top of the beer VIA a funnel while trying not to make too large a commotion in the ocean.

Question...

I shook the tea mixture a bit trying to get it to cool therefore aerating the heck out of it; Will that cause oxidation?

It was around a quarter gallon...
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Old 04-05-2012, 12:11 AM   #8
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What does anyone think this is?
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:11 PM   #9
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Looks like a yeast raft. A chunk of the krausen that just wont sink. You've got a floater.
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Old 04-05-2012, 01:18 PM   #10
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Oh, and as for the oxidation; maybe? . . . It's really not that much volume though, and hopefully any residual yeast in there might soak some of it up. I wouldn't worry about it too much.

And I just remembered that that's your secondary, isn't it. In that case, I have no idea what that thing is. Unless you did have a fairly decent chunk of yeast on the bottom of the secondary that could have been knocked loose by adding the tea.

It doesn't look like an infection to me. Maybe its your beer messing with you because it's upset about being tea-bagged.


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