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Old 06-14-2007, 12:46 AM   #1
cheezydemon
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Sorry, I had posted a thread on the "bottling and kegging" on bottle conditioning high gravity beers. I got some good info, but I hoped that someone who really understands carbonating high alcohol brew would take a look at it.

 
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Old 06-14-2007, 02:25 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon


Sorry, I had posted a thread on the "bottling and kegging" on bottle conditioning high gravity beers. I got some good info, but I hoped that someone who really understands carbonating high alcohol brew would take a look at it.
I understand it. Lots of people understand it. The problem is, it's a compromise and all the options are less than ideal. The best option is to artificially carbonate it. That's the only sure-fire way. But you? You want a method that is not what the truly knowledgeable and experienced beer experts would do. Let's face it, if you were a hardcore brewer, you would spend the $300 or so to be able to force carb. So basically, you are asking for the "people who really understand it" to answer your question... with the caveat that the people who really understand it can't be anybody who has figured out the fact that the best way to do it is no with bottle conditioning.

In other words, the reason you have not received a satisfactory answer is because you are asking for an answer nobody can give. The truly experienced brewers have given up and take the easy route. You want to take the hard route. Well... nobody can help you with that.. or else it wouldn't be the hard route.

You might as well be asking how to brew without mashing. Sure it can be done, but don't expect your average brewer to be an expert on it. It's just not that common of a thing. In my opinion, the reason you haven't gotten a satisfactory (to you) answer is that it is a complicated question involving more variables than you really want to deal with.

Again, I suggest you just resign yourself to a lesser degree of carbonation. It will be accurate for the style. You want more than that without force carbing, then you are in obscure territory where only the most penniless of hardcore brewers would tread...
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Old 06-14-2007, 08:28 PM   #3
cheezydemon
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Actually I have read of many very fine brewers who bottle condition. I have even heard of 20+ year old brew being tasted at very prestigious events. And I doubt very much that it has to do with funds. I enjoy using my mind and figuring out complex problems....isn't this supposed to be a hobby???
I will give you the benefit of the doubt, but your reply could not have been more snobbish. All good brewers who are not penniless take the easy way out..............
That just doesn't ring true. But thanks for the reply.

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Old 06-15-2007, 01:01 AM   #4
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be very very clean with every thing you do ,and use a keg or heavy glass flip tops and it will carbonate ,my ipa sounds like a shot gun firing when i open it and it steadily bubbles the whole time your drinking it ,even down to the last drop ,be very clean with your brewing

 
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Old 06-15-2007, 01:34 AM   #5
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I get it. Thanks! I just don't want to screw it up. I am going to wait 5 months or so to really enjoy it, and it would really suck for it to be flat or overcarbonated. Thanks for the advice.

 
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Old 06-15-2007, 01:39 AM   #6
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how high? I had a high 1.090 og 1.008 fg nut brown that i bottle conditioned after 2 weeks fermentation and 2 months secondary that came out exqistitly(?) can't wait to do that one again. Everybody thought it was great!

 
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Old 06-15-2007, 05:03 AM   #7
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How high the gravity is is very important. Also, you might want to check out the yeasts alcohol tolerance (white labs has it on their website www.whitelabs.com) If the yeast have not pooped out, then they will indeed carbonate! Good luck!

PS I think this is a great project!

 
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Old 01-23-2009, 09:44 PM   #8
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let's say you're shooting for ridiculous....
like dfh 120 min ipa clone, or a 16-21 % A.B.V. imperial stout.

is it possible to carbonate by adding fresh yeast flakes to each bottle along with some priming sugar?
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Old 01-24-2009, 10:28 AM   #9
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And the zombie thread arises from the grave! When you start getting high ABV like that, the yeast simply can't tolerate it and will just go dormant, fresh yeast or no. My 15% RIS is barely bubbly after a year of conditioning and I suspect that's just leftover CO2 from fermentation.
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Old 01-26-2009, 05:11 PM   #10
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I think the fun is to figure this all out. Racking to a keg and force carbonating is the easy way. I enjoy the complexity of all steps of brewing. Infact, I am getting ready to bottle a honey blonde, fermented with champagne yeast, I plan to use honey as the primer.

Side note, Brooklyn recently brewed a Stout that was bottle conditioned. Black Ops Stout, aged in bourbon barrels and bottle flat with champagne yeast to carbonate. Wonderful beer, now I'm a little biased, but it was the best beer I've ever had. So, I would imagine that Brooklyn could afford all the fancy equipment to force carbonate, but they chose to bottle condition. I'm with CheesyDemon, it's the hobby.
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