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Old 03-30-2012, 03:51 PM   #1
bbshopplf
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If there's no point in making a yeast starter with dry yeast, why not always use dry yeast? Why ever use liquid?

Given the popularity of liquid, I'm sure there's a reason. Is there a good FAQ/wiki somewhere?

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:52 PM   #2
Seven
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There's much greater variety available with liquid yeasts.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:53 PM   #3
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One word, variety!








edit:
oops! too slow.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:44 PM   #4
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Most of the flavor in your beer is derived from the yeast. The liquid yeast strains have been propagated for use on specific styles and greatly lend to the proper flavor profiles of those styles.
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:47 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbshopplf View Post
If there's no point in making a yeast starter with dry yeast, why not always use dry yeast? Why ever use liquid?

Given the popularity of liquid, I'm sure there's a reason. Is there a good FAQ/wiki somewhere?
why use dry yeast?

either question is kind of dumb....
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:48 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helibrewer View Post
Most of the flavor in your beer is derived from the yeast.
Is this true? I always thought that most of the flavor was from the malt and the hops. I know that some Belgian beers get some flavors from the yeast, but I wouldn't say "most".

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:50 PM   #7
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I was always led to believe that yeast comprised approximately 1/3 of the flavor in beer, where malt and hops each lent an add'l 1/3. Although obviously a very clean yeast will simply accentuate your malt and hop flavors... so... no correct answer?

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bendersae View Post
Is this true? I always thought that most of the flavor was from the malt and the hops. I know that some Belgian beers get some flavors from the yeast, but I wouldn't say "most".
you sir are incorrect. yeast have the overall bigest impact on the flavor of the beer (i mean it is creating alcohol). you can over-hop this sh*t out of something and this will eventually overpower the yeast flavors, but a balanced beer is heavily influenced by the yeast.

have you ever tasted your wort prior to fermentation? it tastes nothing like that after fermentation...
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bendersae View Post
Is this true? I always thought that most of the flavor was from the malt and the hops. I know that some Belgian beers get some flavors from the yeast, but I wouldn't say "most".
Agree with you. Saison, Belgian, Sours . . . possibly, but for "most" beers the yeast is only one of many flavor and aroma contributions. In fact, in a lot of beer you are looking for a neutral yeast to highlight the character from the hops or grain. For most beer styles the yeast profile is secondary to a proper balance of the different hops and malts used.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:56 PM   #10
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If you use a clean yeast strand then the yeast contribute little to flavor.
Like US-05 or WPL001.

Brew up a smash and split it into 2 fermenters using different yeast.
Do one with a US-05 and do the other with a something more exciting.
You will birth 2 very different beers from the same kettle. Yeast is very important to the taste of the beer.

 
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