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Old 03-30-2012, 02:44 PM   #1
shibbypwn
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Mar 2011
dallas, tx
Posts: 62


About to keg for the first time- also my first all grain batch. Lots of excitement.

I've read about various ways to keep kegged beer cloudy, without pouring out mass quantities of yeast slurry every time I want a pint.

I could cold crash... But I'm afraid I'd lose too much yeasty goodness. Anybody done a short cold crash perhaps?

Then there's the keg shaking method- I guess it's the macro version of swirling your Weizen before pouring?

Some say that only the first few pours will be slurry, but then it'll be fine after that, while others say that more yeast will continue to settle, making for a cloudy first glass every drinking session.

And yes, I know that not all haze is from yeast. But I actually want yeast in suspension for health reasons. Vitamin B is your friend

So how do YOU keg your cloudy beer styles?

Mine's a wit btw- pretty basic recipe.
50% Belgian Pils
45% Flaked Wheat
%5 Flaked Oats
3oz Valencia Orange Peel
.75 crushed coriander.
WLP 400 with starter.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:52 PM   #2
castlefreak
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Jan 2009
Kansas City, Missouri
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I don't think there's any way around having all the yeast settle out, especially when you cool the keg to serve. You have a good amount of wheat in the recipe, so I think it will be naturally hazy while it's still pretty fresh.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:59 PM   #3
cheezydemon3
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Even bottled brews worth their salt say to "swirl" implying that settling has ocurred.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:00 PM   #4
cheezydemon3
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Maybe gently turn keg and store upside down, turn right side up to serve.

 
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:23 PM   #5
JesseRC
 
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Well if you are just going for the cosmetics, I know some folks add 1 tablespoon of flour to the boil at 5min left. This will keep the whole keg hazy. However you mention its more about the yeast. My only recommendation is drink it young. Some will settle quite a bit after 3 weeks. I've had some of my witbiers completely clear by the time it gets to past half way.

Maybe you could find a way to push co2 via the out post of the keg, maybe every few days. That should stir things up
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Old 03-30-2012, 04:17 PM   #6
cheezydemon3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JesseRC View Post
Well if you are just going for the cosmetics, I know some folks add 1 tablespoon of flour to the boil at 5min left. This will keep the whole keg hazy. However you mention its more about the yeast. My only recommendation is drink it young. Some will settle quite a bit after 3 weeks. I've had some of my witbiers completely clear by the time it gets to past half way.

Maybe you could find a way to push co2 via the out post of the keg, maybe every few days. That should stir things up
possible genius.

I need a liquid to liquid hose for transfer, you would need a gas to liquid for that.....

Maybe just switch posts and gas it?

 
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Old 04-04-2012, 05:15 PM   #7
JesseRC
 
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Yeah, you just need a liquid disconnect mounted at the end of a gas connection. I would de pressurize the keg before doing this. You dont want any liquid coming up the gas line.. If you're using threaded disconnects this should be easy must swapping.
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Primaries: Mojave Red (AG)
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Future Brew: Wee Heavy

 
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Old 04-04-2012, 05:36 PM   #8
cheezydemon3
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Nice JesseRC. That is probably the best answer.

 
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:29 PM   #9
Wheatmeister
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Aug 2010
Columbus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shibbypwn View Post
About to keg for the first time- also my first all grain batch. Lots of excitement.

I've read about various ways to keep kegged beer cloudy, without pouring out mass quantities of yeast slurry every time I want a pint.

I could cold crash... But I'm afraid I'd lose too much yeasty goodness. Anybody done a short cold crash perhaps?

Then there's the keg shaking method- I guess it's the macro version of swirling your Weizen before pouring?

Some say that only the first few pours will be slurry, but then it'll be fine after that, while others say that more yeast will continue to settle, making for a cloudy first glass every drinking session.

And yes, I know that not all haze is from yeast. But I actually want yeast in suspension for health reasons. Vitamin B is your friend

So how do YOU keg your cloudy beer styles?

Mine's a wit btw- pretty basic recipe.
50% Belgian Pils
45% Flaked Wheat
%5 Flaked Oats
3oz Valencia Orange Peel
.75 crushed coriander.
WLP 400 with starter.
Someone already mentioned it, but with about 10-15 mins left in the boil add 1tsp flour. mix it with 1/2-1cup of hot water and shake it up, dissolving out any clumps before dumping in the pot. It works, very well. Make sure you mix with warm water 1st though, the 1st time i did this i plopped 1 tsp directly int the boil and it floated around looking like a golf ball and did nothing.

 
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