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Old 03-25-2012, 02:39 PM   #1
Hophead138
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Default First attempt at creating a recipe...feedback?

This is my first attempt at creating my own recipe. I mostly just plugged away at beersmith. Im attempting my first all grain brew in a month or so and i wanted to make a stout. So heres what i came up with please let me know whta you think or if i should tweak anything...

10lbs Pale malt(2row)
1lb Roasted Barley
4oz. Chocolate Malt
4oz. Black Patent Malt

1.5oz Fuggles 4.5% for 60 mins
.5oz. East Kent Goldings 5% for 10 mins

English Ale Yeast WLP#002

I estimated at about 68% efficiency for my first all grain batch. It came out to having an OG of 1.054. IBU's at 26. Est. ABV at 5.

ANy tips on tweaking the recipe or executing it to perfection?


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Old 03-25-2012, 03:10 PM   #2
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My favorite stout grain bill is just pale malt and roasted barley. IMO the other dark malts aren't necessary. I'd say start simple, and add ingredients in future batches and see how it tastes different.


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Old 03-25-2012, 03:15 PM   #3
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is that a decent amount of grain for a 5 gallon batch 10 pounds pale malt and 1 poung roasted malt? and does everything else look appropriate for the style? also for my first all grain should i worry about step mashing or anything? or just mash in at like 158 til conversions all set and then mash out at like 172?
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Old 03-25-2012, 03:24 PM   #4
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i'd say your recipe looks great, and go for it as-is. those 4 oz of chocolate and black patent will add a little flavor but certainly won't be taking over at those amounts. your stout will be dark, then again it's a stout

a single mash is good. sounds like you're ready to go - so go!
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Old 03-25-2012, 03:27 PM   #5
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I would get rid of the chocolate + black patent, add a body building adjunct and up the base malt to reach your target OG.

Choose your mash temp. wisely! My preference is to use a low temp for a dryer stout (149 f) and at those temperatures I will usually mash 120 mins. I usually have 2 hours of stuff I can do during the mash anyway.

Good luck,
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:05 PM   #6
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What are the pros and cons of mashing in at a lower tempereture say around 132f or so as oppossed to mashing in around like 152f.
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hophead138 View Post
What are the pros and cons of mashing in at a lower tempereture say around 132f or so as oppossed to mashing in around like 152f.
Don't mash under 148*. Barley malt doesn't fully gelatinize until around 145*. The window is pretty narrow.
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:07 PM   #8
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hm interesting. What about for a protien rest? isnt that preformed around the low 140 range?
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
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hm interesting. What about for a protien rest? isnt that preformed around the low 140 range?
Protein rests are used to break down proteins that cause problems with the haze, they do very minimal starch conversion. Your beer will be as dark as midnight, the haze won't matter.
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Old 03-25-2012, 04:16 PM   #10
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Alpha amylase works best between 154 and 162, beta works best between 131 and 150 (according to Palmer). so you want to be somewhere in between. Mashing in the upper 150s wii give you a less fermentable wort with fuller body than mashing in the 140s. I like to mash at the same temp (152) for all beers and control body/fermentability with the ingredients. A consistent process with allow you to see what different ingredients do. With todays highly modified malts, its never really necessary to mash longer than 60 minutes.


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