What am i doing wrong - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > What am i doing wrong

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-23-2012, 11:47 AM   #1
bschrodt
Recipes 
 
Mar 2012
Posts: 2


My son got me into home brewing this past winter. I have made about 8 batches so far. The beer tastes great, however it's always very cloudy. I am using kits that include the malt in a can, dry malts, hops, and such. And then there is the stuff floating in the fermentation stage. Anyone care to share some basic pointers? My goal is to get to where i am making full grain instead of kits.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 11:51 AM   #2
Backporchbrewery
Recipes 
 
Feb 2010
Columbus, MS
Posts: 275
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts


To clear it up, use a whirlfloc tablet in the boil at 15min.
You can also use Nox unflavored gelatin (grocery store/walmart) to clear it up in the fermenter. Just boil a cup or two of water and add 1/3-1/2 pack of that gelatin, let it cool and pour it in your fermenter. Give it a swirl and usually a day later it's clear.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 11:54 AM   #3

There are several things that can cause cloudy beer (yeast, suspended proteins, polyphenols), so there several things that may help:

1) use Irish moss (or Whirlfloc) in the boil
2) chill the wort quickly post-boil
3) give the beer sufficient time to settle before bottling
4) crash chill (or lager) the beer prior to bottling
5) after bottles have carbonated, chill for a sufficiently long time before drinking

What is your process? This may help diagnose where the haze is coming from.

You can use gelatin too, but I'd save that as a last resort.
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 02:10 PM   #4
homebrewdad
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
homebrewdad's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Birmingham, AL
Posts: 3,269
Liked 382 Times on 278 Posts


Floating junk during fermentation is perfectly normal. I find that if you give the beer long enough before bottling, it tends to clear up beautifully.
__________________
Check out the priming sugar calculator, yeast starter calculator, and the beer calorie calculator.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 02:19 PM   #5
yancydc
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Washington, District of Columbia
Posts: 103
Liked 11 Times on 5 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
There are several things that can cause cloudy beer (yeast, suspended proteins, polyphenols), so there several things that may help:

1) use Irish moss (or Whirlfloc) in the boil
2) chill the wort quickly post-boil
3) give the beer sufficient time to settle before bottling
4) crash chill (or lager) the beer prior to bottling
5) after bottles have carbonated, chill for a sufficiently long time before drinking

What is your process? This may help diagnose where the haze is coming from.

You can use gelatin too, but I'd save that as a last resort.
Another thing I've found is the bottling procedure. Mine have been clearer since I started racking to a bottling bucket with a spigot and letting it sit for a while before actually bottling, and using the spigot. Before that, I used a racking cane and picked up a lot of junk.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 03:48 PM   #6
MimersMead
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Toronto, Ontario
Posts: 44

I only had one beer that was cloudy during bottling, but it cleared up in the bottle without an issue.

I generally let my beers sit long enough in the primary that all the cloudy settles out. My favorite brew uses Irish moss as well, so that really helps!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 04:02 PM   #7
Hockeyhunter99
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Fargo, ND
Posts: 597
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


I will use Irish Moss in all of my beers that i can see through.

do you feel that the cloudyness is detracting from your beer experience? is the beer hazy or does it have actual particles of yeast and hops?

without actually seeing an example it is hard to fine tune the problem.

are you pouring slowly and leaving a small amount in the bottom of the bottle? it takes some practice to pour a homebrew without the sludge at the bottom coming out with the beer. about a half an inch should remain and that will have yeast and hop particles in it.

are you making any wheat beers? they are suppose to be cloudy and have a haze to them.

would love to help but need some more answers.

personally, if they taste good - don't worry about the haze.
__________________
Beer Renaissance definition - transformation from a heavy beer drinker to drinking heavy beer

Keg - American Pale Ale

Primary - Chocolate Cascadian Dark Ale
Primary - ButterBeer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 04:06 PM   #8
H-ost
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Bellevue, WA
Posts: 1,708
Liked 72 Times on 53 Posts


My question would be, how long are you keeping your beer in the fermenter?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 06:15 PM   #9
cyclonite
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Posts: 314
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by H-ost
My question would be, how long are you keeping your beer in the fermenter?
Ditto. Do yourself a favor and leave every beer in the fermenter for at least 3-4 weeks.
__________________
On Deck: CaliCommon, Amber, Wit
Primary: Munich/Cascade SMaSH, Dubbel
Secondary: Petite Orange
Bottled: Blé de Minuit, Belgian Stout, Fuller's London Pride, Tripel Wit, Red, APA, Dubbel, Oatmeal Stout, RIS, Wee Heavy
Kegged: APA, Doppelbock, Spiced Cider, C3IPA

"Beer... Now there's a temporary solution!"

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2012, 08:37 PM   #10
AdamPag
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
Glen Cove, NY
Posts: 351
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


I get mixed results as far as clarity is concerned, however, I brew simply for the pleasure of brewing and not for competition (although I just finished a belgian pale that was technically awesome and potentially an award winner) so I honestly dont care much. If it has a slight chill haze etc so be it. However, IF you're looking for that ultra clear brew, DONT brew wheats lol. It highly depends on the style you're brewing, obv stouts dunkels, wheats are never going to be clear because they arent supposed to be.

Other wise, Whirlflock works great @ the last 15 mins of the boil and around the 2 week mark my grav samples have solid clarity. As mentioned, you can cold crash for 24 hours around 40* to drop the yeast out of suspension, then bring your fermentor into position an hour or so before racking to your bottling bucket in order to let it settle out (I usually just do this and dont cold crash), and what Ive found to really help it knowing how to properly use your auto siphon for a nice tight rack. I actually measured out exactly where my siphon starts grabbing air instead of beer and I rack just a centimeter below that mark, I get just about every drop off the yeast cake with minimal trud sucked up, practice makes perfect



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump