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Old 03-21-2012, 01:24 AM   #1
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Default Persimmon

I'm thinking far ahead but am curious of a lambic idea. In the fall we have persimmon trees that bear bushels upon bushels of this fruit. Women make every type of dessert known to man with it and I'm curious about brewing a lambic with it. Has anyone here done this? How would the fruit be prepared before adding it to the secondary? Would it be better to add a lambic blend yeast, or let the bugs find it naturally since it's local fruit? Or can that even be done?

Sorry for all the questions, just had the idea tonight for some reason and thought who better to ask than the pros in the Lambic forum.

Thanks Mike


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Old 03-21-2012, 12:37 PM   #2
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I have never made one, but Upland brewery produces a persimmon sour that is very well received.


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Old 03-21-2012, 02:36 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by KaiserBierMann
I'm thinking far ahead but am curious of a lambic idea. In the fall we have persimmon trees that bear bushels upon bushels of this fruit. Women make every type of dessert known to man with it and I'm curious about brewing a lambic with it. Has anyone here done this? How would the fruit be prepared before adding it to the secondary? Would it be better to add a lambic blend yeast, or let the bugs find it naturally since it's local fruit? Or can that even be done?

Sorry for all the questions, just had the idea tonight for some reason and thought who better to ask than the pros in the Lambic forum.

Thanks Mike
It sounds like a great idea! Usually fruits are added later in fermentation for lambics, like six months to a year. I would recommend pitching a lambic blend and let it go for six months then add persimmons to it. I've never brewed with them so I couldn't tell you how much, but 1 - 1.25 lbs per gallon is a pretty standard amount when adding fruit to a beer. I would imagine that the flavor of persimmons would work best with a lighter styled beer. Maybe something along the lines of a soured Belgian golden strong ale.
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Old 03-21-2012, 02:50 PM   #4
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Sorry for all the questions, just had the idea tonight for some reason and thought who better to ask than the pros in the Lambic forum.
There are several types of persimmons that have varying characteristics and times when they are ready to be consumed/used. Buyer beware, but they are very high in tannins, especially the skins, so keep this in mind. It took almost 2 years to age out the harsh tannic notes from my fuyu persimmon melomel (I did not use the skins) and now it is still like a dry sherry more than any melomel or similar.
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Old 03-21-2012, 09:10 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Randar

There are several types of persimmons that have varying characteristics and times when they are ready to be consumed/used. Buyer beware, but they are very high in tannins, especially the skins, so keep this in mind. It took almost 2 years to age out the harsh tannic notes from my fuyu persimmon melomel (I did not use the skins) and now it is still like a dry sherry more than any melomel or similar.
I didn't know persimmons were that tannic. Maybe the best options would be to do a quick blanch to peel the skins off or maybe even just juice them by hand, as a juicing machine would probably extract tannins off of the skins.
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Old 03-22-2012, 01:03 AM   #6
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I didn't know persimmons were that tannic. Maybe the best options would be to do a quick blanch to peel the skins off or maybe even just juice them by hand, as a juicing machine would probably extract tannins off of the skins.
Depends which variety you have. Fuyu, at the height or their ripeness, are the consistency of jelly on the inside and can be scooped out with a spoon. American persimmons are a different ballgame and I am not all that familiar up here where they are non-existent.
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Old 03-22-2012, 01:23 AM   #7
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Thanks for the info, looks like I need to get smart about persimmons before doing this.

I googled Uplands Persimmon lambic, and that looks good. I make it to Bloomington a few times a year, I might have to see if I can find some next time I'm up there.
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Old 03-22-2012, 02:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randar

Depends which variety you have. Fuyu, at the height or their ripeness, are the consistency of jelly on the inside and can be scooped out with a spoon. American persimmons are a different ballgame and I am not all that familiar up here where they are non-existent.
I have a Texas persimmon mead still in the secondary. Pretty sweet but so far so good.
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Old 03-22-2012, 10:08 AM   #9
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The persimmons out here would be fine as long as you take a little bit from each one to test the ripeness. It's a fine line between perfect and mouth puckering.
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:33 PM   #10
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I have a Texas persimmon mead still in the secondary. Pretty sweet but so far so good.
Interesting. I presume you used American persimmon. I think mine turned out too dry which is part of the problem.


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