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Old 03-13-2012, 02:42 PM   #11
wilserbrewer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by michael.berta View Post
I've awarded in a BJCP competition on beer that was fermented with reused yeast that was not washed. I don't think it's as bad of a practice as some people think. YMMV
I have never washed yeast. I simply scoop about a quart of slurry from the fermenter w/ a large sanitized ladle into a zip lock bag. To pitch, I simply sanitize the outside of the bag and cut a top corner w/ sanitized scissors, pour off excess liquid and add to the fermenter. Very easy and seems to work a charm.

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Old 03-13-2012, 04:01 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pabloj13

This is one way that washing yeast helps. Once you wash it you can estimate the volume of clean yeast you have. You can't do that when it is all mixed up with trub.
Sure you can. The calculator at Mrmalty.com even has an option for pitching from slurry.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pm5k00 View Post
Sure you can. The calculator at Mrmalty.com even has an option for pitching from slurry.
This is what I use. If I pitch within a few weeks of harvest, it is easy to pitch enough yeast without making a starter.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 05:14 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by taa800 View Post
When you are pitching your reused yeast (whether it's washed or not), would I need to create a starter if I have enough yeast? I looked at my jars today and the pint jar is about half full of sediment/yeast on the bottom and the top is liquid. If I pour off the liquid can I just pitch what's left? I'm not against washing the yeast, but I'd like to stay away from creating a starter if I don't have to.
You can tell what is yeast and what is trub.The layer on top will be milky
white about 1/8 to 1/4 " thick anything below that is trub.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:25 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pm5k00 View Post
Sure you can. The calculator at Mrmalty.com even has an option for pitching from slurry.
Right. I am aware. But if it is not washed, it is hard to tell how much is yeast and how much is trub.
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:30 PM   #16
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I once pitched on a yeast cake that had dried to the bottom of a sealed fermenter, all cracked and brittle.

I pitched on the whole thing since some people had convinced me that the poor little dears are so delicate.

Fermentation was healthy and vigorous.

FANTASTIC beer.

I use 1 cup or so from most cakes for the new batch.

If you think that there is enough trub in 1 cup of slurry to make one bit of difference, I will just have to disagree.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 06:53 PM   #17
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I don't choose to wash yeast because I'm afraid of off flavors from trub etc, and I don't pretend like I can accurately measure my washed yeast visually when determining pitching rate (especially after making a starter with it).

I wash yeast because I can store it in my fridge for a year without issue. Washed yeast is stored in clean, oxygen/alcohol minimized water. If you're going to use your yeast again in the near future, storing trub-laden slurry is ideal. My brewing is too irregular to store yeast this way. I love my little library of a half dozen washed yeast strains that live in my fridge. To each their own.
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:43 PM   #18
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I used WLP028, Edinburgh Scottish Ale yeast for an Irish Red (suggestion from my LHBS to their recipe, worked very well), repitched on half of the yeast cake when I redid the recipe, and then used the remaining slurry from the first batch (which had been sitting in the fridge for almost 4 weeks now) for a scottish strong ale. I was worried about the yeast's viability in the strong ale, but after 72 hours I found a thick layer of foam and signs of a HIGH krausen in my fermenter bucket (despite no airlock activity- gonna check that lid and seal really carefully for leaks after this Strong Ale is done!)

Cake and slurry is simple, and yeast love to recycle old material like their dead brethren. I have high hopes for this upcoming batch.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 08:59 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbeergeek View Post
I don't choose to wash yeast because I'm afraid of off flavors from trub etc, and I don't pretend like I can accurately measure my washed yeast visually when determining pitching rate (especially after making a starter with it).

I wash yeast because I can store it in my fridge for a year without issue. Washed yeast is stored in clean, oxygen/alcohol minimized water. If you're going to use your yeast again in the near future, storing trub-laden slurry is ideal. My brewing is too irregular to store yeast this way. I love my little library of a half dozen washed yeast strains that live in my fridge. To each their own.


That does sound awesome.

While I will continue undeterred to pitch 1 cup or so of yeast/trub etc, I may wash and ranch some of the more specific styles.

 
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Old 03-13-2012, 09:14 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3



That does sound awesome.

While I will continue undeterred to pitch 1 cup or so of yeast/trub etc, I may wash and ranch some of the more specific styles.
I have used slurry that was well over a year old before, it was stored in my kegerator at 30*F. Just make a starter with it and your good to go. I currently have 8 strains that I save this way.

 
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