1-Gallon Brewers UNITE! - Page 232 - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > 1-Gallon Brewers UNITE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-06-2013, 03:57 AM   #2311
dtfleming
Recipes 
 
Feb 2012
Westminster, Maryland
Posts: 117
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts


Has anyone tried the AHS 1 gal recipes?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 11:51 PM   #2312
Antler
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Carbonear, Nl
Posts: 711
Liked 19 Times on 17 Posts


I been doing 5 gallon BIAB on a propane burner since this spring. Lately it's been really cold and windy so holding mash temps outside will be a nightmare. I already have 2, 2 gallon pots. Been thinking about just doing 1 gallon batches in the kitchen until I can afford an electric setup to put in my 5g system.

I already have 3 batches worth of grain here, mixed and crushed, in large vacuum sealed bags. How can I brew these in 1 gallon batches and combine in fermenter?

I was thinkin to start it all in my 7.5g fermenter. 1g at a time and each couple days brew up another 1g batch and add to the fermenter.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 12:18 AM   #2313
paul_111
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
St Charles, Illinois
Posts: 129
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ostomo517 View Post
Fill in the blanks on this http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/brew/widgets/bp.html
And racking in this case is siphoning from your fermenter to bottling bucket.
How necessary is it to rack to a bucket? Why not just fill the bottles directly from the fermenter? I was going to use a mini autosiphon and spring-tip bottle filler. Any reason not to go this route?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 12:19 AM   #2314
jwalk4
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
jwalk4's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
London, Ontario
Posts: 944
Liked 160 Times on 130 Posts


Would you wait until you had 5, 1-gallon batches in the fermenter before you pitched your yeast?

If so, I foresee a problem if any bacteria should find its way into the fermenter. The sugars may be (in part), already consumed by bacteria by the time you finally pitch your yeast, and thus, you'll have competing cultures. Also, you'd risk oxidation.

If you pitch your yeast after 1 1-gallon brew, then just continually add wort, I would be concerned about the under pitching your yeast.

You would have to re-pitch yeast everytime you add more wort, but with the reproduction of yeast cells in the wort already, you would have to account for the number of daughter cells to gain an accurate amount of how much yeast you'd have to pitch every time.


Honestly though, I have no experience in this matter. These are just my .02 on possible outcomes. I would love to hear a Mod's opinion.
__________________
Fermenter 1 - Vienna /Saaz SMaSH
Fermenter 2 - Dry as a bone
Drinking - various craft brews, Tiny Bottom PA
Beer styles I'm trying to nail down: APA, Porter, Mild, Amber, & Something Yellow and Fizzy.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 12:22 AM   #2315
jwalk4
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
jwalk4's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
London, Ontario
Posts: 944
Liked 160 Times on 130 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by paul_111 View Post
How necessary is it to rack to a bucket? Why not just fill the bottles directly from the fermenter? I was going to use a mini autosiphon and spring-tip bottle filler. Any reason not to go this route?
The only reason to not go that route is because you'd have to find a way of mixing in the priming sugar solution without stirring the yeast back into suspension and get a lot of trub in your beer. That why we have bottling buckets.

You can bottle from primary if you use tabs, but you'll have to put up with the over carb issue.
__________________
Fermenter 1 - Vienna /Saaz SMaSH
Fermenter 2 - Dry as a bone
Drinking - various craft brews, Tiny Bottom PA
Beer styles I'm trying to nail down: APA, Porter, Mild, Amber, & Something Yellow and Fizzy.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 01:23 AM   #2316
paul_111
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
St Charles, Illinois
Posts: 129
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalk4 View Post
The only reason to not go that route is because you'd have to find a way of mixing in the priming sugar solution without stirring the yeast back into suspension and get a lot of trub in your beer. That why we have bottling buckets.

You can bottle from primary if you use tabs, but you'll have to put up with the over carb issue.
That makes sense. Thanks!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 01:52 AM   #2317
Antler
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Carbonear, Nl
Posts: 711
Liked 19 Times on 17 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalk4
Would you wait until you had 5, 1-gallon batches in the fermenter before you pitched your yeast?

If so, I foresee a problem if any bacteria should find its way into the fermenter. The sugars may be (in part), already consumed by bacteria by the time you finally pitch your yeast, and thus, you'll have competing cultures. Also, you'd risk oxidation.

If you pitch your yeast after 1 1-gallon brew, then just continually add wort, I would be concerned about the under pitching your yeast.

You would have to re-pitch yeast everytime you add more wort, but with the reproduction of yeast cells in the wort already, you would have to account for the number of daughter cells to gain an accurate amount of how much yeast you'd have to pitch every time.

Honestly though, I have no experience in this matter. These are just my .02 on possible outcomes. I would love to hear a Mod's opinion.
No I'd pitch the yeast With the first gallon.

I thought the yeast would grow with every addition of wort, sort of like stepping up a starter 5x.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 02:51 AM   #2318
Ostomo517
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Nov 2012
Norton Shores, Michigan
Posts: 1,585
Liked 597 Times on 381 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jwalk4 View Post
Would you wait until you had 5, 1-gallon batches in the fermenter before you pitched your yeast?

If so, I foresee a problem if any bacteria should find its way into the fermenter. The sugars may be (in part), already consumed by bacteria by the time you finally pitch your yeast, and thus, you'll have competing cultures. Also, you'd risk oxidation.

If you pitch your yeast after 1 1-gallon brew, then just continually add wort, I would be concerned about the under pitching your yeast.

You would have to re-pitch yeast everytime you add more wort, but with the reproduction of yeast cells in the wort already, you would have to account for the number of daughter cells to gain an accurate amount of how much yeast you'd have to pitch every time.

Honestly though, I have no experience in this matter. These are just my .02 on possible outcomes. I would love to hear a Mod's opinion.
I agree you would be riaking oxidation big time plus exposing to chance of infection every addition.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 03:36 AM   #2319
zeg
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
West Lafayette, IN
Posts: 1,216
Liked 129 Times on 111 Posts


I'm not sure there'd be much of an oxidation risk---wouldn't the yeast kick back into their aerobic metabolism mode and remove the oxygen like they do with the intentionally oxygenated wort at the start of a standard process?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-07-2013, 03:57 AM   #2320
Leadgolem
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Denver, Colorado
Posts: 3,719
Liked 1041 Times on 781 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by zeg View Post
I'm not sure there'd be much of an oxidation risk---wouldn't the yeast kick back into their aerobic metabolism mode and remove the oxygen like they do with the intentionally oxygenated wort at the start of a standard process?
Hmm, this seems likely. If it was my project I'd probably just keep the batches separate if I had the fermentors for it. That way you could make variations with each batch.

If not, then I'd try and shorten the total time to full liquid volume. IE: Do 2-3 batches a day for 2 days. That should mean that all of the oxygen has been introduced in the batch before the yeast has actually changed metabolic modes. As opposed to waiting 2 days between additions, which would give you a total introduction time of 8 days.

Each batch would still have it's own chance of infection, so a pitch rate on the high side would also probably be a good idea. That would limit the impact of the introduction of wild yeast into the brew.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remmy
I'd rather work with yeast than work with people.

 
Reply With Quote


Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gallon markings for 7 gallon plastic primary fermenter scone Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 03-15-2014 07:16 PM
York, Harrisburg and Lancaster Pennsylvania Brewers Unite ENS Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 06-24-2013 11:28 PM
Is 1 gallon of head space in a 5 gallon carboy secondary OK or not OK? msa8967 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 4 09-08-2011 01:53 AM
Justed Racked my first brew and appear to be low 1/2-1 gallon in 5 gallon carboy. Brandow Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 7 07-15-2011 05:23 PM
5 gallon batch + 5 gallon primary fermenter = good noisy123 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 07-30-2008 11:45 AM


Forum Jump