anyone have air in their lines? - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > anyone have air in their lines?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-03-2012, 07:32 AM   #1
somedudefromguam
Recipes 
 
Feb 2012
Albany, Oregon
Posts: 149
Liked 13 Times on 9 Posts



Have you ever experienced co2 pockets in your keg lines? I keep my lines coiled and hanging, so co2 bubbles up and creates pockets in the line and the next pour ends up foamy. Solutions??? I wonder what bigger breweries do...



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 09:01 AM   #2
FarmBoy530
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
AUburn, Ca
Posts: 210
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


I have worked in a "bigger brewery" and you shouldn't have air in your lines. When co2 puts head pressure on your keg beer comes out the dip tube. co2 doesn't push through the beer into the line. Check your tubing connections and make sure you have tightened hose clamps on all of em. To me it sounds like you have an air leak.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 01:20 PM   #3
rausched
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
, Indiana
Posts: 21

I have two kegs that do this exact thing, rest of my kegs pour fine; I've tried new gaskets, switching dip tubes/lids, longer beer lines; sprayed star san all over the lid looking for bubbles from leaks and can't find anything. Hopefully someone on here can help.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 01:44 PM   #4
day_trippr
Recipes 
 
May 2011
Stow, MA
Posts: 16,929
Liked 2851 Times on 2136 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by rausched View Post
I have two kegs that do this exact thing, rest of my kegs pour fine; I've tried new gaskets, switching dip tubes/lids, longer beer lines; sprayed star san all over the lid looking for bubbles from leaks and can't find anything. Hopefully someone on here can help.
I would focus on the Out dip tube and its o-ring, because gas getting into the beer line would have to either be sneaking around the o-ring at the dip tube flange, or entering through a pin hole or crack in the tube above the beer line...

Cheers!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 01:49 PM   #5
thargrav
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
Huntsville, Alabama
Posts: 821
Liked 38 Times on 35 Posts


Air isn't getting in, CO2 is coming out of suspension. And this almost always means that your beer is over carbonated or your serving pressure is too low.

somedudefromguam Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 02:23 PM   #6
badbrew
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
l.a., ca
Posts: 1,372
Liked 13 Times on 13 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by thargrav View Post
Air isn't getting in, CO2 is coming out of suspension. And this almost always means that your beer is over carbonated or your serving pressure is too low.
LOL this^^^I have one keg that does that. I force carbed it at 30 psi before connecting to the manifold. No big deal. Just unplug the gas and leave the relief valve open for a few minutes and gas back up. There is too much co2 in the beer compared to the regulator pressure.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 03:38 PM   #7
bucfanmike
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
bucfanmike's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
Duluth
Posts: 1,025
Liked 27 Times on 24 Posts


this also happens when you have temperature stratification. If air is moving in whatever you are using as a fridge the lower in the box the colder it is. Cold Beer comes from the bottom of the keg and as it sits in the warmer hose the co2 can break out of solution. Mine used to do this until i built a small fan to move cold air around.
__________________
Mike in Duluth

Currently on Tap
1. Hefeweizen
2. BM Centennial Blonde
3. LHMS Clone

Pipeline
Next on Tap-Denny Conn Rye IPA
Kegged and aging Ed Worts Apfelwine, Denny Conn BVIP
Fermenters -

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 03:58 PM   #8
JRems
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Mahopac, NY
Posts: 2,221
Liked 60 Times on 52 Posts


If you overcarbed your keg, then lowered the psi to pour better, the co2 will come out of suspension in your line. To test if this is the problem, Jack your pressure up 10 extra psi, pour 6 or so ounces then watch the lines. If in a few minutes no bubbles form, the keg was overcarbed. To fix just unhook the keg and burp the pressure over a couple days.
The other possibility is there is crap builtup in the line and giving the co2 nucleation sites to come out of suspension.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 03:59 PM   #9
thargrav
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
Huntsville, Alabama
Posts: 821
Liked 38 Times on 35 Posts


Every kegerator with a beer tower has this problem until you install some sort of beer tower cooler in the tower.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2012, 07:47 PM   #10
somedudefromguam
Recipes 
 
Feb 2012
Albany, Oregon
Posts: 149
Liked 13 Times on 9 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by thargrav View Post
Air isn't getting in, CO2 is coming out of suspension. And this almost always means that your beer is over carbonated or your serving pressure is too low.
Ok! Sounds like this could be my problem... I have a couple brews now that I serve around 3.1 volumes. I have to lower my pressure to serve because I have been experiencing excessive foam when I try to balance the system properly. I used 25' of line once and the flow rate was OK, but it still came out foamy.
Thanks for the advice!



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
10' lines chriscraig Bottling/Kegging 15 01-26-2012 11:46 PM
Keg Lines Petho Bottling/Kegging 4 12-12-2011 07:32 PM
gas lines houndhome1 Bottling/Kegging 3 03-17-2008 09:57 PM
Keg lines ArroganceFan Bottling/Kegging 6 09-18-2007 01:39 AM
CO2 lines FSR402 Bottling/Kegging 11 08-03-2007 03:20 PM


Forum Jump