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Old 02-29-2012, 11:50 PM   #21
tektonjp
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So the CO2 from my tank and the CO2 from a yeasty's butt are chemically different?
I don't think so. If they are the same, and both go into solution the same way, then given all other variables remain constant, bottle and keg should be the same taste.
Of course they will pour differently. And that visual will throw off your taste perception. Do a blind taste test.
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Old 03-01-2012, 01:26 AM   #22
JayWeezie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calpyro

Please explain what is "bottled beer taste"
I just feel like adding that lil bit of sugar can affect the taste. Pouring it out of a keg tastes much better to me.

 
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Old 03-01-2012, 02:08 AM   #23
JuanMoore
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayWeezie View Post
My mistake. I guess you can you use it to carbonate. I was thinking the OP was going to use both.
But why use both if you can just use CO2.
Adding the priming sugar will just get you right back to a bottled beer taste. When kegging gives you a cleaner beer. IMO.
The most common reason people prime kegs to carb is a full keezer/kegerator. By priming naturally you have a fully carbed keg waiting to be tapped as soon as there's an empty spot, with no waiting for it to force carb before you can begin drinking it.

I'm not sure where you got this idea, but adding priming sugar isn't going to result in a different taste than force carbing. It might change the mouthfeel slightly, but even that is debatable. Those who do believe there's a difference in mouthfeel all agree that naturally carbonated beer is superior to force carbed beer. Several commercial brewers are so convinced that it produces finer bubbles and better mouthfeel that they go to great expense to naturally carbonate their beers rather than force carb them.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JayWeezie View Post
I just feel like adding that lil bit of sugar can affect the taste. Pouring it out of a keg tastes much better to me.
It's being poured out of a keg either way.

My guess is that you're associating naturally primed beer with bottled homebrew that has sediment on the bottom which either hasn't been compacted completely, or was poured in such a way as to disturb it. If the sediment is disturbed at all and mixes with the beer, it does change the flavor, but this is completely unrelated to the discussion at hand. Bottled homebrew tastes the same as kegged if the sediment doesn't get disturbed. You've obviously never had homebrew that's been naturally carbed and then served out of a keg, and yet seem convinced that it would taste different. Trust us, it doesn't.
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Old 03-01-2012, 02:29 AM   #24
yipp
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I'm running into a similar situation. I'm going to be priming my keg since I won't get my co2 tank until a few weeks after kegging.

Will it cause problems if I separate my 5 gallons between 2 corny kegs if I'm only using corn sugar to prime? I will have no access to a co2 tank for 2-3 weeks. I'm doing 2 kegs as one is mine and the other is for a friend.

 
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:14 AM   #25
JuanMoore
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yipp
I'm running into a similar situation. I'm going to be priming my keg since I won't get my co2 tank until a few weeks after kegging.

Will it cause problems if I separate my 5 gallons between 2 corny kegs if I'm only using corn sugar to prime? I will have no access to a co2 tank for 2-3 weeks. I'm doing 2 kegs as one is mine and the other is for a friend.
It will be hard to figure out the correct amount of priming sugar due to the large headspace. You normally need less priming sugar for carbing in the keg rather than bottles, but in your case I'd use the same you would to bottle, and the if it's slightly under carbed you can bring the carb level up once you get your CO2 tank. You'll also want to use keg lube on the lid o-rings since you need a good seal and won't be able to give it a blast of pressure.
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:21 AM   #26
PA49erFan21
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I've kegged plenty of kegs already and I have NEVER primed it with sugar. Hell, you can go on AustinHomeBrew and when you go to purchase priming sugar, the one option says "Do not add sugar - I keg". I just set my psi to 30 psi in my keg after filling it, roll it around to saturate it, then let it set in the kegerator for 36 hours, release the pressure and reset it to serving pressure, usually around 8-10psi. Plenty of threads on here about that.

 
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:28 AM   #27
tektonjp
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Ever hear of real ale?
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:29 AM   #28
mciaio
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I would fear not having the keg seal properly with the priming sugar. Lots of wasted time if all the CO2 leaks out of a partially sealed keg. It just builds CO2 too slowly for my liking. To each his own though.

 
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:35 AM   #29
JuanMoore
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mciaio
I would fear not having the keg seal properly with the priming sugar. Lots of wasted time if all the CO2 leaks out of a partially sealed keg. It just builds CO2 too slowly for my liking. To each his own though.
It builds enough pressure to verify a sealed keg within a day at the most. I've carbed ~8 kegs this way, and they all sealed fine, but I verified the seal after a day each time just to be sure. Now I have a second CO2 tank at my shop where I do my fermentation so I can seal the kegs with pressure when I prime to carb.
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:36 AM   #30
mciaio
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Hmm, I might have to try this then. Thanks Juan.

 
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