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Old 02-26-2012, 08:22 PM   #1
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What home brewing books should I buy? Any books I shouldn't buy?


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Old 02-26-2012, 08:33 PM   #2
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What's your experience level?


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Old 02-26-2012, 09:43 PM   #3
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Yeah, it depends on where you're at and what you've got already. How to Brew is the gold standard it seems for a first book. There's a free version if you want to check it out online (http://www.howtobrew.com/), but there have been several new editions in the print form with quite a few updates, so I'd suggest spending the money and actually buying the book. The Complete Joy of Homebrewing is another good beginner's book that I actually started with instead.

After that, there are a bunch of books that will depend on where you want to go. Here's the order that I wound up going in if that helps at all:

Brewing Classic Styles is a good collection of recipes and descriptions of different styles, so a good place to start as you're trying to move on from kits to putting together your own recipes.

Designing Great Beers is excellent for recipe construction once you've decided to stop just adjusting recipes and want to start making your own recipes.

New Brewing Lager Beer would have been another good beginner's book, but I got it specifically because Noonan does a great job of describing decoction mashes. Its not just about lager like the title implies, its generally a good all around book but was kind of redundant after the previous beginner's books with the exception of the decoction section.

Radical Brewing, Wild Brews, Brew Like a Monk, Yeast, Farmhouse Ales, and Brewing with Wheat are all getting into more specific areas of brewing. Any would be good once you've got the basics down if you want to start getting more advanced in a certain area.
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Old 02-26-2012, 09:46 PM   #4
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I highly recommend How to Brew. It is a great read and very informative. It has all the info needed to become a great brewer!
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:04 PM   #5
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+1 on the new John Palmer Book; How to Brew...it's the Gold Standard for New Brewers and old alike. Spend the $'s and put in into your collection!

Then Brewing Classic Styles (so you know the styles w/solid recipes to start with) followed by Radical Brewing (that's so you know that there are no rules in brewing!)
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:39 PM   #6
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You can learn a lot right here at HBT.

I like "Designing Great Beers" by Daniels for help with specific styles, or even books on specific styles (like "Bock" by Richman).

Some good information on fermentation in "Yeast" by White and Jainasheff and it is current, whereas some of the older references are pretty dated.

"New Brewing Lager Beer" by Noonan is good.

I have "Brew Chem 101" by Janson but read it before I was ready to get much out of it. I should re-read it soon.
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Old 02-26-2012, 10:49 PM   #7
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+1 to How to Brew; Brewing Classic Styles; and Designing Great Beers. Those and a subscription to Brew Your own or Zymurgy will take you as far as you want to go. Then, figure out how to control ferment temps.
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Old 02-27-2012, 01:43 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osagedr View Post
I have "Brew Chem 101" by Janson but read it before I was ready to get much out of it. I should re-read it soon.
Yeah, that's a good one, just got it for Xmas.
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Old 02-27-2012, 02:09 AM   #10
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Brewing classic styles! The best. If you get more advanced, the yeast book is great (chris white and jamil)


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