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Old 02-23-2012, 01:42 PM   #1
jfrans84
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I must be the only one that botched this up. Put my Nottingham yeast in clean, slightly warm water. I gave it a couple of stirs, let it sit for bout a minute. Then bumped it I into my cider. My buddy that was there "helping" said rehydrate for 15 seconds. After pitching I realized it was suppose to be 15 mins. First time I have ever used notti. IS THIS A PROBLEM?



 
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Old 02-23-2012, 01:55 PM   #2
smuth10
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Nah. It will rehydrate itself.

FWIW, I think it was BYO magazine that just had a write up about this. They did an experiment with half the people re-hydrating and the other half not. The results were split as to which one was better, and they said either way you should have a great beer. Good luck!


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Old 02-23-2012, 02:10 PM   #3
jfrans84
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Good to know, thanks! I was just a little worried after 12 hours nothing is really happening.

 
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Old 02-23-2012, 02:13 PM   #4
smuth10
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I would wait at least 24-36 hours and then re-pitch if necessary
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Scott...

Primary: Reaper's Mild
Secondary:
Kegged (aging):
Kegged (Drinking): DFH 120 Min IPA Clone, Hefe
Bottled: Cinnamon Vanilla Mead, 8-8-08 RIS, Devil May Cry, Westvleteren 12 clone, Very Berry Mead
On Deck: How Rye am I Saison, DFH 120 min clone

 
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:13 PM   #5
TyTanium
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I think the thought process is that you lose some viability/cell count by going directly to intense straight-wort environment...by letting them rehydrate more cells survive the process.

But those dry yeast packs pack a punch so you'll have plenty of cells to do the work. And Nottingham is a beast. 99% sure you'll have no adverse effects.

 
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Old 02-23-2012, 03:35 PM   #6
jfrans84
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That makes me feel a little better about it. Not quite sure what I'm going for on my first batch.
4.5 gal treetop cider
4lbs dark brown sugar
I stick of cinnamon, broken in half
Nottingham yeast
Lina of curious to know what it will taste like?
OG was 1.075~1.08ish

 
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:31 AM   #7
KWKSLVR
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What was the difference in temperature between your starter water and your "wort"? If it was big, you easily could have killed off a ton of yeast due to shock, not to mention that Nottingham should sit for 15 minutes or so before you stir. Dry yeast is robust, but as it is, the second you pitch dry yeast onto wort you lose a solid half of them. There's a ton of cells in dry yeast, so big deal. But then add in stirring too soon and temperature shock, and you could have lost another half. Then, in this particular case, you have a ton of fuel, more fuel than the cell count can work with. I'd re-pitch, even if you start to see fermentation.

You pitched a small amount of yeast on a TON of sugar. I don't see a way it will finish. 4lbs of sugar and 4.5 gallons of juice on a yeast with a 12% alcohol tolerance - that, in itself is fine. 1.080 OG isn't too big for Nottingham by any stretch, but pitch 2 packs to be on the safe side. Any time you're pitching 1 packet of dry yeast on an OG that high, starter or not, you're risking being under pitched. The biggest problems I seem to taste out of homebrew of any kind, at least when it comes to big beers/ciders, is being underpitched. You need enough yeast to eat up all of those fermentables and then do cleanup duty as well.

Also, for future reference, I'd add cinnamon, etc into secondary after fermentation is complete. You never know what kind of things yeast will do to adjuncts during primary fermentation - usually not good tasting things.

I'd pitch at least another packet and a half of yeast directly into your fermentation vessel and aerate if you didn't the first go around. Good luck, you should end up with some jet fuel for sure! LOL

 
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Old 02-24-2012, 05:45 AM   #8
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It'll be fine. There's always better ways to do things, but the magic of this hobby is you will have success no matter what you do.

Don't worry, alcohol just happens, it's one of Newton's laws of physics, stuff wants to be alcohol.
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Old 02-24-2012, 08:28 PM   #9
jfrans84
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Well I'm going to keg this, so I'm going to keep an eye on it. I'll probly rack and cold crash at about 1.03-1.035, and force carb. That's about 6-7% I think? I'll just have to see how it turns out. I'm keepin my finger crossed

 
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Old 02-25-2012, 10:37 PM   #10
KWKSLVR
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Repitch dude. Better to be overpitched than under. Even the Lallemand people warn against temperature shock and what it will do to Nottingham. #4: Usage

http://beer.danstaryeast.com/sites/d..._datasheet.pdf



 
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