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Old 02-17-2012, 07:05 PM   #1
3sheetsEMJ
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Oct 2011
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Im trying to clone a recipe (extract) with 5.3% abv, and it says on the website the beer is 12degrees Plato, so doesnt that mean it has an OG of 1.048 (12X .004 +1)? Wheni tried to reverse engineer it on Brewbuilder im geyting an OG of 1.54 (13.5plato) and abvof 5.3, and it seems the only way to reduce the OG is reduce the extract amount, but this lowers the abv.

So im wondering, how do i maintain alc abv but not increase OG? Should i even be worried about this? I'm not stuck on making an exact clone ( sawtooth ale by left hand brewing co by the way), i just like the beer and want to be close...

 
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Old 02-17-2012, 07:22 PM   #2
scottland
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May 2010
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That must be a very dry beer, or they must bottle condition it. If the OG is 12 Plato, then yes, the SG is 1.048.

You're forgetting about the Final Gravity. it also affects the ABV. To get a 5.3% ABV beer from 1.048 OG, you'd need the FG to come in around 1.008. Or, the FG could be around 1.010, and they bottle condition it which bumps the ABV a couple points.

Brew the beer with a target of 1.048 if you want to clone it.
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Old 02-17-2012, 08:48 PM   #3
3sheetsEMJ
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Oct 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottland
That must be a very dry beer, or they must bottle condition it. If the OG is 12 Plato, then yes, the SG is 1.048.

You're forgetting about the Final Gravity. it also affects the ABV. To get a 5.3% ABV beer from 1.048 OG, you'd need the FG to come in around 1.008. Or, the FG could be around 1.010, and they bottle condition it which bumps the ABV a couple points.

Brew the beer with a target of 1.048 if you want to clone it.
Can you explain why that would produce a dry beer? To be honest im not even sure what dry means? I know it is used to describe wine...

 
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Old 02-17-2012, 09:12 PM   #4
HBDrinker008
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Aug 2007
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Final gravity is the amount of residual sugars left in your beer after it ferments. A higher final gravity means more residual sugars and a sweeter or fully bodied beer. When your final gravity gets very low it means there are less sugars left over for a lighter bodied beer. If you consider water has a gravity reading of 1.0 the closer you get to that with your final gravity the more watered down your beer will taste.

Why it's referred to as "dry" I guess I can't be sure of. I guess its just the term designated to be the opposite of sweet.

I guess I didn't answer the question, Dry refers to a lower FG

 
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:08 PM   #5
3sheetsEMJ
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Oct 2011
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Haha thanks, I actually really appreciate the detail, I'm a big picture kind of guy so I like to know the full explanation...

 
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