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Old 02-10-2012, 02:00 PM   #11
Jayhem
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My milk stout finished at 1.023 and it is like a meal it's so thick and full bodied compared to my APA at 1.012 which tastes much drier and clean.
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Old 02-10-2012, 02:21 PM   #12

Just to play a little devil's advocate here...I would argue that if a beer is completely fermented out, but still has a high FG, it will not really be all that much sweeter than a beer that finishes with a lower FG. Sweetness comes from small, simple sugars, which should be completely fermented out. The sugars/carbohydrates that are NOT fermented and that contribute to the high FG and body of the beer are generally NOT really that sweet.

If a beer is overly sweet then I think it probably has some fermentable sugars left in there and did not complete fermentation. Obviously though, some sweet sugars, like lactose, are not fermentable and will contribute to both a high FG and a sweetness (like in milk stouts)
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Old 02-10-2012, 02:35 PM   #13
Jayhem
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLem View Post
If a beer is overly sweet then I think it probably has some fermentable sugars left in there and did not complete fermentation. Obviously though, some sweet sugars, like lactose, are not fermentable and will contribute to both a high FG and a sweetness (like in milk stouts)
Exactly! That's why milk stout recipes often have maltodextrose and/or lactose. My current milk stout had 8 oz of each and it tastes freakin' awesome! sometimes I like a break from hop taste and like a sweet heavy beer!
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Old 02-10-2012, 03:47 PM   #14
jester5120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by breweRN

will try that.. how much should i use?
For an average beer (1.050 to 1.070 is average for me) I use about a pound of oats
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Old 02-10-2012, 03:52 PM   #15
jester5120
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acuenca
Also just a comment head retention is due to protein not sugar or higher fgs... Oats carafa will add to the protein content and increase protein content and head retention..add 0.5 to 1 lb per 5 gallons...
I was always told that specialty grains such as caramel malts and wheat increase head retention. I've seen this first hand. The explanation I've heard for caramel malts is because the starches are already converted and they have some unfermentable sugars. Ive never heard the protein argument.
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Old 02-10-2012, 04:13 PM   #16
spenghali
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There are many sizes of proteins in beer. Mid size proteins (polypeptides and peptones) are not useful for the yeast but they give body and increase head retention. This makes sense if you think about it. Since there are tiny little proteins floating around, they reduce the surface tension and thus they increase the stability of the CO2 floating out of the beer. As surface tension decreases, head retention increases. However, these proteins also contribute to haze!

 
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Old 02-10-2012, 04:16 PM   #17
spenghali
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I should add that you are correct about unfermentable sugars and caramel malts too.

 
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