Is This What 'Cold Break' Looks Like? - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Is This What 'Cold Break' Looks Like?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-09-2012, 04:40 AM   #1
Stankonia
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
San Francisco, CA
Posts: 168
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts



I brewed 2 batches back-to-back this past Saturday and experienced something I never have before:



This pic is after the keggle was already emptied to my carboy after chilling, so the foam itself is taking up half of the keggle.

I use an immersion chiller, and have a 15" false bottom in my BK. Also, I use whole hops loose in the kettle.

I read that whole hops help filter out cold and hot break, but this seems ridiculous. It looked and felt like a can of cool whip exploded in the kettle. You can kind of see the tracks left behind when I ran my hand through it.

So is this what cold break looks like, or could it be something else?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 04:41 AM   #2
Stankonia
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
San Francisco, CA
Posts: 168
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


oops, I meant to post this in the All-Grain forum..

Oh well, this should work

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 08:56 AM   #3
diS
 
diS's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2011
Croatia
Posts: 997
Liked 49 Times on 46 Posts


I think it is hot break.
__________________
We are only 10,000 years into beer... there are thousands of years left to go!
Things are bound to change!!

Brewroom with HERMS build
Fermentation chamber and Keezer.. a.k.a. FermKeezer

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 01:48 PM   #4
wyzazz
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Atwater, OH
Posts: 4,315
Liked 56 Times on 53 Posts


What did you brew? It looks like hot break but it certainly couldn't be that if you chilled and emptied the keggle. It's certainly protein break material.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
And I'd like to see my 1.080 beers ready from grain to glass in a week, and served to me by red-headed twin penthouse pets wearing garter belts and fishnet stockings, with Irish accents, calling me "master luv gun," but we can't always get what we want can we? :)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 03:07 PM   #5
Stankonia
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
San Francisco, CA
Posts: 168
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


The pic was of a stout so it was a pretty diverse grain bill, the the base was 2-Row. The same thing happened on the IPA I Brewed next which was pretty much all 2-Row.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 03:30 PM   #6
samc
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Portland OR
Posts: 5,387
Liked 63 Times on 59 Posts


Odd for sure. Are you using Irish Moss/Whirlfloc or similar? Water changes?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 03:50 PM   #7
wyzazz
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Atwater, OH
Posts: 4,315
Liked 56 Times on 53 Posts


Looks like about 2 cans of condensed milk at knockout, crazy!
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
And I'd like to see my 1.080 beers ready from grain to glass in a week, and served to me by red-headed twin penthouse pets wearing garter belts and fishnet stockings, with Irish accents, calling me "master luv gun," but we can't always get what we want can we? :)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 04:01 PM   #8
jgln
Recipes 
 
May 2008
Southern, NJ
Posts: 3,486
Liked 54 Times on 42 Posts


Huh, never seen head on a beer before it is carbed.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2012, 06:03 PM   #9
TomRep
Recipes 
 
Sep 2009
Fleetwood, PA
Posts: 1,002
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts


What burner are you using and are you getting a good, rolling boil? thinking your burner may be undersized and you not getting a good boil (ie. hot break) until you evaporate some liquid which is toward the end of your "boil". just a guess here cause it certainly does look like hot break to me.
Tom
__________________
Abandoned Logic Brewing

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2012, 02:44 AM   #10
VladOfTrub
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
, Pa
Posts: 743
Liked 173 Times on 118 Posts


You nailed it when you mentioned back to back batches. That makes for a long brewing day. Now, since you probably didn't want to spend 8, or 10 hours brewing. You may have sped up your process. The foam is a result of a short or slow boil. Foam and hops are the first thing over the rim of a boiler during the dreaded boil over, when the boiler isn't large enough. The foam in your boiler would have dissipated if the boil was right. You didn't get a decent hot break. The best way to know when you boiled long enough is to look at the wort while it is boiling. Once you boil past the foam stage, continue to boil until the wort appears to glitter as it boils. When you see the wort glistening, you hit the hot break. In old brewing jargon it was called "falling bright in the boiler." A simmering 60 minute boil won't achieve a good hot break in a heavy grained dark beer, any Pilsner, or fine Ale. Also, try slowing down the run off from your lautertun. You carried some "mud" into your boiler.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Keep Cold Break in? sambogi76 General Techniques 10 05-01-2010 12:49 PM
5 min cold break... c1377 General Techniques 7 09-28-2008 05:41 PM
Cold Break - In or Out? BakerStreetBeers General Techniques 12 05-30-2008 04:16 PM
Cold Break kmlavoy General Techniques 2 01-29-2008 03:36 AM
not much cold break BeerAg General Techniques 15 11-25-2007 05:03 AM


Forum Jump