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Old 02-20-2012, 06:32 PM   #11
mrbheid
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so i ended up adding a "tea" of lemon and lime peels, ginger and brown sugar to the beer in addition to another packet of dry yeast.

Didn't have any vodka but used gin instead (haha, this is truly an experiment) to sterilize a baggy full of additional fresh peels of lemon, lime (lil or no pith) and ginger slices in which i hope will infuse their flavor in a dry hop. Hoping the alcohol from the gin doesn't interfere much with the secondary fermentation. will it??? Tried to wring the baggy of peels and ginger out as much as possible but obviously some residual gin still on it when i floated this bag in the beer fermenting bucket. Checked this morning, we have some mild bubbling. Good sign no??? i will leave the bag in until i rack for bottling. how long should i wait for secondary fermentation to complete? i'll give it a week and go from there

What are you're thoughts you guys?

thanks -brandon



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Old 02-21-2012, 03:03 AM   #12
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The gin will add a little alcohol bump but shouldn't interfere with the fermentation. The bubbling is likely the yeast working down the brown sugar. You should be fine in that regard. Keep in mind for the ginger that a little goes a long way, especially if you're going to dry hop it. I'd be very restrained in the use until you got a better feel for how much flavor it contributes. For the fermentation time, check using a hydro until you get 2-3 identical readings but I would imagine it should eat up the sugars in a few days to a week. Should be interesting!


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Old 02-21-2012, 04:13 AM   #13
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hmmmm, haha, good to know about the ginger. I added quite a bit, equal proportions to the lemon and lime (one decent sized root sliced thinly). When i tasted the "tea" i made with the lemon, lime peels, ginger, and brown sugar, i didn't pick up really any ginger. Idk, i guess well see. Thanks for the heads up. To you think you'll taste the gin notes?

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Old 02-21-2012, 08:36 AM   #14
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Ive tried a few mint stouts,they always remind me of Fernet.
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:35 PM   #15
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I know Dogfish Head has a mint beer. I want to say Red & Black? It was a lot like drinking an alcoholic Thin Mint GSC.

I don't think I'd get it again, but it's been done.
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Old 02-21-2012, 01:38 PM   #16
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Here we go:
http://www.dogfish.com/brews-spirits.../black-red.htm
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Old 02-21-2012, 03:56 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrbheid View Post
To you think you'll taste the gin notes?
I doubt it. I'm assuming you only used enough to make a tincture of sorts. With that much volume my guess is you won't taste it.
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:51 AM   #18
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My first attempt at brewing, bottled last week, was actually a mint ginger ale. Here's the procedure I used. I wrote this down incase I wanted to make it again.

Minger Ale
Ingredients
4-5 gallons water Preferably filtered
12 tablespoons spearmint tea
4 large tea bags
4 short pieces of string
6 grams munton premium gold active brewing yeast
1 1/2 cups lime juice
11 1/4 cups ginger syrup, see directions for making below.
5 cups baking splenda
1/2 lb fresh ginger root.
2 lbs of sugar, approximent

Pour 3 gallons of water into a large slow cooker or stock pot. Bring the water to a bare simmer. Spoon 3 tablespoons into each of the tea bags. Close up the tea bags, place the tea bags in the simmering water. Simmer for 7-15 minutes to taste. Remove tea bags. Remove from heat. It is also fine to add the tea earlier, it just won't do much until the water is hot.

Grate the ginger root into a medium sauce pan. It is not necessary to peel the ginger first. Cover with more of the water. Boil until the ginger smell mellows. This can take anywhere from 10 minutes for new ginger, or around an hour for old ginger.
Pour the contents of the pot through a sieve into a bowl. Make sure to get all the ginger out of the pan. Discard the ginger solids in the sieve.
Use a 1 cup measuring cup to move the liquid from the bowl back to the sauce pan. Make sure to keep track of how much liquid you have. Add 1 1/2 times the volume of the liquid, in sugar, to the sauce pan. Keep on low-medium heat, stirring regularly, until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from heat.

Place remaining water in a pot or sauce pan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Cover.

Allow the syrup, tea, and water to cool.

Using a funnel, pour the 11 1/4 cups syrup into a sterilized 4+ gallon bottle or carboy. Add the yeast, lime juice, tea, and splenda. Add additional water until you reach a volume of 4 gallons. Place the cap on the bottle, shake to combine and aerate. Install your airlock. Place the brew someplace cool and dark. Wait...

The reason I used spearmint is both that it isn't "peppery" the way pepper mint is, and it grows wild in my backyard. I cut it every 2-3 weeks and it produces 1 1/2 to 2 cups of dried peppermint each time. This is after destemming and crumbling into tea sized flakes.

The overall flavor is good. Strong mint flavor. Good ginger flavor too. The boiling mellows the ginger considerably. Not much fire, just good flavor. A little warmth in the back of the mouth after drinking is all. The color is a light yellow with a tinge of green to it. It was practically opaque when I bottled and pasturized it. It is still slightly murky after chilling in my fridge for a week, though it has cleared considerably.

I did halt the fermentation to early though. The result is a brew that is sweeter then I intended. Next time I would use a yeast nutrient as a lot is going to be missing from the syrup and the tea that the yeast would need. I would also add the splenda after the fermentation was complete. Otherwise, it would be problematic to get the sweetness where you wanted it. I would also make a starter first, and use around 10 grams of yeast in a 1 quart or so starter.

I did not own a hydrometer at that time, so I am unable to determine the ABV.

Based on the additions you made, that may be closer to what you are looking for in a future brew.
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Old 08-04-2012, 08:01 PM   #19
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I have a chocolate mint plant. I thought I would find awesome uses for it but as it turns out it's really only used for desserts. I think it would make an interesting beer but I haven't played with it enough to figure out the best way or the best quantity to try.
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Old 08-06-2012, 06:29 PM   #20
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There's a tiny brewery in Charlotte called NoDa Brewing that makes a pretty good beer called the Nodajito, its a belgian wit with mint and lime. I 'm glad I decided to have a sample when I asked the bartender about it because she told me it was weird, but I liked it.


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