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Old 02-05-2012, 07:02 PM   #1
loetz
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Dec 2011
Vienna, Austria
Posts: 119
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Hey, All:

I'm trying to put together a recipe for a big American style stout such as a Yetti, Bell's, or Founders but I'm having a hard time figuring out what ingredients to use.

From what I gather, typical recipes use 2-row, chocolate, roasted barley, and black patent for the malts.

The problem is that I don't have easy access to a lot of these ingredients here in Vienna. I can probably order the specialty malts, but I'd rather not spend a lot on having the base malts shipped.

Given that these are my options for base malts in Vienna, what would you guys use to start your recipe?
http://www.holzeis.com/index.php/cPath/1_4/language/en

I'd like the beer to be something with a lot of body and kind of sweet.

Thanks

 
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:10 PM   #2
jaycount
 
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Dec 2010
Wichita, Kansas
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Wow you're really limited on malt supply. I don't recognize some of those malts, but I do see some roasted barley.

One thing for sure, if its your first high gravity all grain (you mention Yeti so I'm assuming you're doing an imperial stout), have some dark DME or LME on hand in case you miss your pre-boil OG. You need to sparge alot more on a higher grav brew than you would on a lower grav brew and depending on your setup, you may have a maximum volume that you can sparge into your BK.

Anyways, good luck.

 
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:15 PM   #3
loetz
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Dec 2011
Vienna, Austria
Posts: 119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaycount View Post
Wow you're really limited on malt supply. I don't recognize some of those malts, but I do see some roasted barley.

One thing for sure, if its your first high gravity all grain (you mention Yeti so I'm assuming you're doing an imperial stout), have some dark DME or LME on hand in case you miss your pre-boil OG. You need to sparge alot more on a higher grav brew than you would on a lower grav brew and depending on your setup, you may have a maximum volume that you can sparge into your BK.

Anyways, good luck.
Thanks for the tips.
I'm still really curious what I should use as my base malt. What do I substitute the 2-row for? Pils?

 
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:24 PM   #4
BryanJ
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Jan 2010
Ithaca, N.Y.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaycount View Post
One thing for sure, if its your first high gravity all grain (you mention Yeti so I'm assuming you're doing an imperial stout), have some dark DME or LME on hand in case you miss your pre-boil OG.
I would steer clear of any dark malt extract and instead use light malt extract if you need to use any. You have no clue what is inside of dark malt extract.

There is plenty of malt to do an imperial stout. You can use a either munich, vienna or pilsner for your base malt and do a combination of the two caramel malts with a little bit of roasted barley.

 
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:29 PM   #5
loetz
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Dec 2011
Vienna, Austria
Posts: 119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanJ View Post
There is plenty of malt to do an imperial stout. You can use a either munich, vienna or pilsner for your base malt and do a combination of the two caramel malts with a little bit of roasted barley.
I probably can get some chocolate malts through a friend of mine too, but am I missing much by leaving out the black patent?

 
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Old 02-05-2012, 07:31 PM   #6
loetz
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Dec 2011
Vienna, Austria
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And what would be the difference between using the vienna, pilsner, or munich?

 
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Old 02-15-2012, 01:41 AM   #7
yetanothersteve
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Aug 2009
Portland, OR
Posts: 37

The pilsner would be the lightest and least malty, vienna next, and munich the darkest and maltiest of the three.

If they really have no chocolate, the munich as your base malt would probably do very well.

On the speciality malts page I noticed there was "roated" malt as well as roasted barley. The "roated" might be the chocolate or black patent for which you seek.
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Old 02-17-2012, 02:05 PM   #8
loetz
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Dec 2011
Vienna, Austria
Posts: 119
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yetanothersteve View Post
On the speciality malts page I noticed there was "roated" malt as well as roasted barley. The "roated" might be the chocolate or black patent for which you seek.
Yep, I talked to someone here about it and that's what the said. For some reason they don't use the word chocolate or black patent, but it's the same thing.

 
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