Adding honey - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > Adding honey

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-03-2012, 01:31 PM   #1
Jbird
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
lemoore, ca
Posts: 385
Liked 15 Times on 13 Posts



I'm brewing an American wheat this week end. I was thinking of adding honey but I don't want the yeast to just eat it and then it does not give any flavor. When should I add it to make it have that honey flavor? Also how much should I add? I am going to be making a 5gal batch.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 01:39 PM   #2
BobC
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Anchorage, Alaska
Posts: 269
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


Honey isn't 100% fermentable by beer yeast so it leaves flavor behind. Add about a 1-2lbs, depending on how prevalent you want the honey taste. Add it like you would any LME.
__________________
Primary 1 - Smash 1
Primary 2 - Smash 2
Primary 3 - Belgium Triple
Bottled - Oatmeal Stout, ESB, Belgium Light.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 04:53 PM   #3
TopherM
 
TopherM's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
St. Petersburg, FL
Posts: 3,974
Liked 450 Times on 355 Posts


Quote:
Honey isn't 100% fermentable by beer yeast so it leaves flavor behind. Add about a 1-2lbs, depending on how prevalent you want the honey taste. Add it like you would any LME.
This a very misleading statement. Honey IS pretty much 100% fermentable, and not all kinds leave a flavor behind. It all depends on what type of nectar the honey is made from, and with the exceptions of a few types, the nectar source is rarely controlled.

Chances are, if you use 1-2 lbs. honey in a recipe, you are going to get a BIT of the flavor in your beer, but it is guaranteed that your are going to boost ABV and DRY out the beer. This ABV boost can throw a good beer recipe out of balance where you taste too much of the alcohol and not enough of the body and bitterness, and a dry beer is generally only a desired taste in certain styles, like some wheats, hefes, porters and stouts. If you want to go that route, add your honey at flameout after your boil is complete. I've had the best results with orange blossum or wildflower honey.

Honey MALT gives a much more controllable and definable honey taste to beer without the unwanted side effects. 0.5 lbs of honey malt per 10 lb grain bill gives a subtle honey flavor, anything over 1.0 lbs per 10 lbs grain bill is too much, so you can use to taste between 0.5 and 1.0 lbs per 10 lb grain bill (or 5-10% of total grain bill if you want to think of it that way).
__________________
Primary #1 - Midnight Ryeder (Midnight Wheat and Rye)
Primary #2 - Florida Weiss
Primary #3 - Kane-DOH APA (Honey Citra APA)
Secondary #1 - Downtown Flanders Brown (brewed August 2012)
Keg #1 - Raspberry Florida Weiss
Keg #2 - Cinnamon Raisin Cider
Keg #3 - NONE!
Bottled - NONE!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 07:38 PM   #4
Calichusetts
 
Calichusetts's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Plymouth, MA
Posts: 3,015
Liked 500 Times on 300 Posts


Honey malt...less than 5% of the grain bill

Bottle with honey, you'll get an instant honey aroma when you smell it.

Adding honey throughout the brew (mash, boil, fermantation) will leave behind some flavor but dry your beer out a lot. It could be desired it its a big beer. Orange blossom is fantastic and I also recommend it, in fact it is all I use to bottle

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 08:23 PM   #5
Doomsday
Recipes 
 
Sep 2011
Anchorage, Alaska
Posts: 170
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts


here you go:

The table in How to Brew states: (percentages are based on weight of total fermentables)

3-10% = For a subtle honey flavor in most light ales and lagers.

11-30% = For a distinct honey flavor note to develope. Stronger hop flavors, caramelized or roasted malts, spices, or other ingredients should be considered when formulating the recipe, to balance the strong honey flavors at these levels.

and 30+% = well you shouldnt be taking that route anyways.

I wouldnt just go tby "add a lb or 2" use the ratios given to addjust the flavor you want.

Also from all of the searching around I have done, it seems like adding honey after primary fermentation is complete helps to maintain a lot more of the honey flavor.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 11:42 PM   #6
Jbird
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
lemoore, ca
Posts: 385
Liked 15 Times on 13 Posts


Ok I think I might try adding 1 pound of orange blossom honey as I rack it to my bottling bucket. Should I still use the priming sugar?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2012, 11:55 PM   #7
erycc
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Posts: 1

I recently racked a batch with honey. Used 1 cup and added 1/4 of sugar. Took a little longer but I love the flavor and aroma.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 02:02 AM   #8
Jbird
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
lemoore, ca
Posts: 385
Liked 15 Times on 13 Posts


So using 1lb of honey and priming sugar would not be a bad thing. I just want to make sure that I won't get bottle bombs from the honey making to much carbonation.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 02:23 AM   #9
chickypad
lupulin shift victim
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
chickypad's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2010
SF Peninsula
Posts: 5,071
Liked 900 Times on 730 Posts


I think you're going to get bottle bombs. It looks like people who use it for priming use about 5 oz per 5gal batch.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2012, 02:40 AM   #10
mid_knight
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
Posts: 28

Midwest Supplies FAQ says to use 1 cup of honey for priming. Which is about 3/4 a pound.

Per John Palmer - the problem with using honey for priming is that the sugar content varies considerably. His online version of the book states: "To use honey, you will need to dilute it and measure its gravity with a hydrometer. For all sugars in general, you want to add 2-3 gravity points per gallon of beer to prime."

Personally - I don't do that when I use honey for priming. But I do open sample bottles every day or two to ensure I am not making bottle bombs - and I have cold-crashed a batch when I did ....

Reason: Clarification

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump