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Old 01-21-2012, 10:17 PM   #1
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Default Steeping Grains

Is 170 degrees to hot to steep grains?


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Old 01-21-2012, 10:21 PM   #2
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Your getting close to potential tannin extraction temps. The 152-156 deg. zone is safer.


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Old 01-21-2012, 10:21 PM   #3
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What effect will that have on my beer?
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:22 PM   #4
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Astringent.
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:25 PM   #5
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How/when will I know if I will end up with bitter beer?
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Old 01-21-2012, 10:56 PM   #6
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You will probably detect an astringent harshness when you taste a gravity sample. There could be other factors that influence extracting tannins from your grain husks. If you used/have hard water, for instance, if your steeping grains were lighter in color, if you used an excess volume of water for steeping, if you steeped for a long time, etc. If, however, you steeped some darker grains and steeped in about 1- 1 1/2 quarts of water per pound of grain, the pH of the steeping liquor would be low enough that tannin extraction would probably not be an issue at 170.
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Old 01-21-2012, 11:14 PM   #7
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3.857 lbs of grain steeped in 2 gallons of water. Grains are from a recipient kit to make a scotch ale. What do you think?
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Old 01-22-2012, 11:14 AM   #8
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If you didn't exceed 170, you will probably be okay. Usually, steeping is just a means to extract sugar from the specialty grains, and this can be done between 150-160 for about 20 to 30 minutes. If this is already fermenting, you will only know when you taste a beer. Gravity samples can taste off (warm, un-carbonated beer.) If it has astringency, you may taste that in the sample. You will probably have to wait until it is conditioned and chilled to tell.

Palmer says in "How to Brew," that 150-170 is the best range for steeping. You are probably fine, but may wish to steep lower in the future so you have one less worry.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:35 PM   #9
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Some of the older texts would have you steep in boiling water. Unless your water with the grain added was alkaline and you went over 170 you didn't extract any tannins. Your beer is likely just fine.
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Old 01-22-2012, 03:50 PM   #10
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You will be fine.

As RM noted, in the past, the extract method for beers was to boil the grains with the extract. Ref: 'Brewing Beers Like Those You Buy', Dave Line, circa 1975.


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