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Old 01-20-2012, 04:51 PM   #1
Dicky
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Sep 2011
Nottingham
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Hi there,

I work at a university in Nottingham where there is an apple tree. This tree has had loads of apples on it since the end of the season. All the leaves have gone leaving just the fruit.

They are quite small apples, i'm not sure what variety they are.
Ever heard if this? There certainly aren't any other apple trees around here baring fruit.

Dicky

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 05:04 PM   #2
Daze
 
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Dec 2011
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sound like crab apples. I don't think they are bearing now just left over. There is a couple feet of snow here on the ground in MT and my dads trees still have a few apples in them. I wouldn't eat them but they are there nun the less.

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:08 PM   #3
BoomerCreek
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Could be a delicious cider apple. If there is enough apples I would not hesitate to make cider from them.
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:28 PM   #4
Daze
 
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I have been around fresh fruit my whole life as my father has tones of fruit trees of many different verities, and I have developed one golden rule for wine making.

If you wouldn't eat the fruit as fruit than don't make wine out of it

in other words if the apples are firm and have good flavor than by all means have a go, but if they are mushy or off tasting than the resulting fermented product will also be sub par. This same rule applies to under ripe fruit.

 
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Old 01-21-2012, 12:35 AM   #5
liquidavalon
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Mar 2008
Salem, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daze
I have been around fresh fruit my whole life as my father has tones of fruit trees of many different verities, and I have developed one golden rule for wine making.

If you wouldn't eat the fruit as fruit than don't make wine out of it

in other words if the apples are firm and have good flavor than by all means have a go, but if they are mushy or off tasting than the resulting fermented product will also be sub par. This same rule applies to under ripe fruit.
On the other hand I have read and seen on documentaries that some of the most bitter, sour apples around makes some of the best cider around. And it was those types if 'cider' apples that makers in England and settlers in America first used and some still use today.

Now mushy, old or mouldy apples...that is a different story.

Edit: A good docunmentary that proves this point is called 'The Botany of Desire' free to watch on PBS. The first 20 min or so talks about apples and is fantastic.

 
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Old 01-21-2012, 12:50 AM   #6
Daze
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by liquidavalon View Post

Now mushy, old or mouldy apples...that is a different story.
That was my point. He is talking about apples on a tree with no leaves so the fruit is probably not good anymore. yes sour and bitter can make for some nice ciders/wines. I like bitter and I like sour, it all depend son the flavor profile you are looking for. Under ripe fruit is typically flavorless so one wouldn't want to eat it as fruit.

 
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Old 01-21-2012, 06:00 AM   #7
liquidavalon
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Mar 2008
Salem, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daze

If you wouldn't eat the fruit as fruit than don't make wine out of it
Oh ok...sorry. I was just commenting about the above quote, because there are some good cider apples that I wouldn't eat as fruit but they make great cider.

 
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Old 01-23-2012, 10:14 AM   #8
Dicky
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Sep 2011
Nottingham
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The apples actually look pretty fine, strangely enough.
However, they belong to the university, and no doubt getting permission to take them would take ages and would be in need of health and safety rubbish.

Mmmmm, bureaucratic apples.

Dicky

 
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Old 01-23-2012, 12:27 PM   #9
gratus fermentatio
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Odds are those apples just didn't fall, I've seen this on several trees, even on the MacIntosh tree in my backyard. As to the variety, ask the groundskeepers, they should know.
Regards, GF.

 
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Old 01-23-2012, 05:31 PM   #10
truckjohn
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Just go get one and taste it... Should answer your questions.... or at least some of your questions....

If you have a refractometer handy - you can check the brix with only a few drops of juice from one apple.... If the brix is up in the 20's - then you got good cider making apples no matter how bitter or sour they taste....

There are many varieties of apples that just hang on the tree - and some of them keep getting better the longer they hang....

Thanks

 
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