Steam vent - what about a kettle lid? - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Electric Brewing > Steam vent - what about a kettle lid?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-20-2012, 02:06 PM   #1
NoCornOrRice
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Great White North
Posts: 227
Liked 18 Times on 9 Posts



So I am in the situation of having a 2nd floor room with a window that can be completely customized for brewing. Rather that a fume hood that will carry away most of the steam, can I just put a lid on the kettle to get rid of all of the steam?

Essentially, I am thinking a tight fitting lid with a window for observing the boil, a port for adding hops / scooping off hot break, and a pipe coming out for a flue. The design in mind would be a gooseneck on the lid (with copper or CPVC) to prevent drip back into the boil and then a flexible, wide hose going out the window and down 10 or so feet.

I am wondering if the vertical drop combined with the water coming out of the steam will create enough draft to make this work? I would also have an air-replacement vent if needed.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 02:10 PM   #2
hamiltont
Recipes 
 
Apr 2009
Somewhere in the middle of Nebraska
Posts: 873
Liked 14 Times on 14 Posts


It would probably draft but your condensation (DMS) would end up back in the pot. Commercial brew kettles have a trough around the top rim to catch the condensation & channel it away from the beer. Cheers!!!
__________________
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 02:49 PM   #3
wailingguitar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Florence, Alabama
Posts: 1,653
Liked 116 Times on 98 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by hamiltont View Post
It would probably draft but your condensation (DMS) would end up back in the pot. Commercial brew kettles have a trough around the top rim to catch the condensation & channel it away from the beer. Cheers!!!
Are you talking about something in the stack or actually in the kettle? Where is this "trough" exactly?
__________________
"Why did you.... what was the point of... how drunk were you when you decided this was a good idea?" - DMartin

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 03:17 PM   #4
hamiltont
Recipes 
 
Apr 2009
Somewhere in the middle of Nebraska
Posts: 873
Liked 14 Times on 14 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by wailingguitar View Post
Are you talking about something in the stack or actually in the kettle? Where is this "trough" exactly?
It's generally around the inside rim at the top of the kettle. If you look at commercial BK's they have a dome on top with a "chimney" going out. The condensation runs down the inside of the dome and it caught in the trough and whisked away.
__________________
If Homebrew & BBQ aren't the answer, then you're askin' the wrong questions... Cheers!!!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 04:25 PM   #5
wailingguitar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Florence, Alabama
Posts: 1,653
Liked 116 Times on 98 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by hamiltont View Post
It's generally around the inside rim at the top of the kettle. If you look at commercial BK's they have a dome on top with a "chimney" going out. The condensation runs down the inside of the dome and it caught in the trough and whisked away.
I thought that was what you meant but wanted to be sure... maybe it's a new design, I have certainly never seen one like that... and I have been inside quite a few commercial brewhouses! (JVNW, BRD, Santa Rosa, Criveller, Specific Mechanical, Century, Saaz... I may be forgetting one or two) Every one of those had a polished smooth edge at the junction of the dome to the side wall. Which manufacturers have you seen do this and do you have an idea when the systems were fabricated?

Edit: I should add that all of these had either; 1) a vent stack that went to the outside of the brewery. The end of the stack having a shield of one sort or another to prevent outside debris from getting in. Or 2) a 90 degree elbow in the stack which had a condenser in it. The condenser would return the steam to liquid form and let it drop to the brewery floor at a drain.
__________________
"Why did you.... what was the point of... how drunk were you when you decided this was a good idea?" - DMartin

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 05:28 PM   #6
frankstoneline
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
ellensburg, washington
Posts: 378
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts


Building a condensation chamber wouldnt be hard and would allow a kettle lid DMS will condense after water, a simple 90 degree and then an expanded chamber before reconstricting and running through a fan out your window should work. if the chimney of sorts is short enough it really shouldnt matter too much.
Another way to take care of it would be in the style of a distillation head, simply run the initial up pipe higher than your outlet, this way most of the condensation ends up hauled down the outlet tube via gravity. Fan free.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-20-2012, 06:09 PM   #7
NoCornOrRice
Recipes 
 
Aug 2010
Great White North
Posts: 227
Liked 18 Times on 9 Posts


cool, I'm going to try this. I'l post results on whether I get bad DMS once the beer is on tap.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2012, 07:17 AM   #8
ClaudiusB
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
El Paso, Texas
Posts: 1,350
Liked 99 Times on 76 Posts


Quote:
It's generally around the inside rim at the top of the kettle. If you look at commercial BK's they have a dome on top with a "chimney" going out. The condensation runs down the inside of the dome and it caught in the trough and whisked away
Quote:
Originally Posted by wailingguitar View Post
I thought that was what you meant but wanted to be sure... maybe it's a new design, I have certainly never seen one like that... and I have been inside quite a few commercial brewhouses! (JVNW,
No new design, has been around since ages.
The condensation trap for the copper kettle exhaust pipe look like this with internal drain pipe.
Some have an external drain pipe on the back of the kettle.

Simple illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/abz.jpg

Stainless Kettles look more like this illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/rinneb.jpg[/jpg]

Cheers,
ClaudiusB

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2012, 12:22 PM   #9
worstbrewing
Recipes 
 
May 2010
Ephrata, PA
Posts: 328
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaudiusB

No new design, has been around since ages.
The condensation trap for the copper kettle exhaust pipe look like this with internal drain pipe.
Some have an external drain pipe on the back of the kettle.

Simple illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/abz.jpg

Stainless Kettles look more like this illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/rinneb.jpg[/jpg]

Cheers,
ClaudiusB
Maybe I'm thinking of it wrong but wouldn't there need to be room for make-up air?
__________________
Worst Brewing

Primary: Empty :(
Brewing soon: Munich Dunkel

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2012, 02:03 PM   #10
wailingguitar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2011
Florence, Alabama
Posts: 1,653
Liked 116 Times on 98 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaudiusB View Post
No new design, has been around since ages.
The condensation trap for the copper kettle exhaust pipe look like this with internal drain pipe.
Some have an external drain pipe on the back of the kettle.

Simple illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/abz.jpg

Stainless Kettles look more like this illustration
http://hobbybrauer.de/bilder/grimbart/rinneb.jpg[/jpg]

Cheers,
ClaudiusB
That's in the bottom of the vent stack, not in the kettle dome itself. With a long vent stack, as the steam rises out of the kettle it will, obviously, begin to cool. The condensate flows down the sides of the stack and the trough catches it before it gets back to the kettle. Maybe I misunderstood what you meant, I thought you were referring to something INSIDE the kettle at the edge of the dome and the kettle wall.
__________________
"Why did you.... what was the point of... how drunk were you when you decided this was a good idea?" - DMartin

 
Reply With Quote


Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
3ph Steam Kettle Wiring Question onthekeg Electric Brewing 17 08-30-2012 03:43 AM
Industrial electric steam kettle blake121666 Electric Brewing 12 11-23-2011 06:24 PM
Steam hood thoughts mrlisk Electric Brewing 11 09-30-2011 11:21 PM
Make up air and vent system questions jsguitar Electric Brewing 2 06-02-2011 03:25 PM
Inline Vent Fan egaberik Electric Brewing 6 02-04-2011 03:10 AM


Forum Jump