Specific gravity reading 1.000 - help please - Home Brew Forums
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:10 PM   #1
Wcampbell
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Jun 2011
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I'm new at this and completed brewing an IPA a few days ago. The OG was 1.041 and the yeast seemed to be fermenting normally. I checked the SG yesterday, as the foam had subsided, and the SG was at 1.000 (same as water). The brew smells and tastes fine but the numbers aren't adding up. What should I do? Buy a new hydrometer? Pitch it and start over? Add new yeast?



 
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Old 01-20-2012, 12:16 PM   #2
DGibb
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How long has this been in primary? Starting at 1.041 and finishing at 1.000 would yield a 5.4% ABV brew.

Did you use a kit? If you did, did the directions predict the final gravity?

All that the final gravity of 1.000 means is that the density of the beer is the same as water; that all of the sugars have fermented out.

There is absolutely no reason to repitch yeast or pitch the beer! The yeast did its job! Relax, don't worry, have a home brew (or if you're new to this, a craft brew).


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Old 01-20-2012, 12:49 PM   #3
Brewskii
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Gravity is a measure of suspended solids in relation to water. Another way to think of it is how thick it is as compared to pure water at roughly room temp.
In a nutshell, beer is sugar ( thicker than water = value greater than 1.000), water( water = 1.000), and alcohol ( thinner than water = value less than 1.000).
When you take a measurement in fermented beer you are measuring the result of all of these things. Therefore it is quite possible to have a 1.000 and have absolutely nothing wrong with anything.
That being said, it is kind of unusual to have a beer that is that close to 1.000 unless you added sugar or other adjunct grains that would ferment compleatly out, or if the wort was very weak to begin with.
Malt extracts and malted grains will usually ferment out to somewhere between 1.020 to around 1.005. Unless it was something unusual. I would think a FG would fall in that range.

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Old 01-20-2012, 01:00 PM   #4
D0ug
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DOn't forget to correct the reading for the temperature of the beer. Hydrometer's are calibrates to read 1.000 in water at a certain temp. Usually 60*F or 65*F and have a correction factor of something like 0.002ish per 3-5*F. You'll have to look at your hydrometer or the info that came with it to see what the correction factor is for yours.

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:03 PM   #5
D0ug
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ps I agree w/ the other posters. Your beer is probably fine. Try not to fret.
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:06 PM   #6
Wcampbell
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Jun 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DGibb
How long has this been in primary? Starting at 1.041 and finishing at 1.000 would yield a 5.4% ABV brew.

Did you use a kit? If you did, did the directions predict the final gravity?

All that the final gravity of 1.000 means is that the density of the beer is the same as water; that all of the sugars have fermented out.

There is absolutely no reason to repitch yeast or pitch the beer! The yeast did its job! Relax, don't worry, have a home brew (or if you're new to this, a craft brew).


Wow, thanks for the quick response and great info! I feel a whole lot better about the situation now. It has been in the primary for 4 days now. I used a Cooper's IPA kit and added some additional Cascade hops (2oz) in the form of an 8min boil hop tea. The prediction in the kit stated an initial of 1.042 and Final of 1.006; so I guess we're not that far off. I'll do exactly what you said.....relax for another week or so and then bottle my new brewed IPA.

One more question....I'm planning on doing bottle carbonation, so how long should an IPA be bottled before trying. I was thinking in the neighborhood of about 4 weeks.

Thanks again for the good advice!

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:33 PM   #7
KraphtBier
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Three to four weeks is pretty much the standard amount of time for carbonation to take place. It may happen quicker or slower depending on the beer. I'd give it three weeks and then sample it.
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Old 01-20-2012, 01:38 PM   #8
starsailor
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BTW, it is possible to end up with a FG < 1.000. I haven't seen it with a beer yet, but I get it fermenting cider all the time because it completely ferments out all the sugars leaving essentially ethanol mixed with water.
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Old 01-20-2012, 04:41 PM   #9
Brewskii
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wcampbell
I used a Cooper's IPA kit and added some additional Cascade hops (2oz) in the form of an 8min boil hop tea. The prediction in the kit stated an initial of 1.042 and Final of 1.006;
Hop tea? How much volume was the kit for ( I'm assuming 5 gal) and how much did you have when your fermenter first filled ?

1.042 is not a big beer at all and If there was any additional water added from the hop tea to the 5 gal volume you probably do have a 1.000 FG beer. Good job.

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 07:58 PM   #10
dcp27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DGibb View Post
All that the final gravity of 1.000 means is that the density of the beer is the same as water; that all of the sugars have fermented out.
under normal circumstances (no bugs or brett), you will almost never (maybe in a saison) get a gravity of 1.000 in an ale. malt is not made up of 100% fermentable sugar

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewskii View Post
Gravity is a measure of suspended solids in relation to water.
you mean dissolved. suspended solids have no effect on a hydrometer



 
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