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Old 01-20-2012, 09:33 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mpavlik22 View Post
My eff is a constant 70%.

So I guess my big beer is only 2.95 gal preboil? That is unless I wish to dilute it even more with plain h20?

How would I plan on collecting 7 gal preboil for my big beer? I assume I have to increase my grain bill, but how do I calculate that?

I understand about just sparging for your small beer, and u dont have to account for grain absorption. Right?

Thanks
I really don't understand what you're asking. I don't mean to be rude, but it really isn't very complicated. Follow the chart. Calculate for evaporation and grain absorbtion like you would any other beer. You know your system.
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Old 01-20-2012, 09:39 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mpavlik22 View Post
My eff is a constant 70%.

So I guess my big beer is only 2.95 gal preboil? That is unless I wish to dilute it even more with plain h20?

How would I plan on collecting 7 gal preboil for my big beer? I assume I have to increase my grain bill, but how do I calculate that?

I understand about just sparging for your small beer, and u dont have to account for grain absorption. Right?

Thanks
I think the miscommunication is that the "big" beer does not mean bigger in volume..it means a higher SG. The "small" beer has a lower SG but is bigger in volume. Clear as mud??
Yes you might only end up with a PB amount of roughly 3 gallons for your first beer. And yes you shouldn't have to account for grain absorption when sparging for your second beer.
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Old 01-21-2012, 12:53 AM   #23
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Do you normally batch sparge, Mpavlik22?

I ask because, from what you posted, it looks like you are planning to run off the first runnings with just the water you doughed in with. As far as I know, you mash in with enough water ti get your grist ratio right, then you add enough at the end of the mash to make your first runnings the volume you want them to be. Then run off untill dry, and add the sparge water.
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Old 01-21-2012, 01:16 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corncob View Post
Do you normally batch sparge, Mpavlik22?

I ask because, from what you posted, it looks like you are planning to run off the first runnings with just the water you doughed in with. As far as I know, you mash in with enough water ti get your grist ratio right, then you add enough at the end of the mash to make your first runnings the volume you want them to be. Then run off untill dry, and add the sparge water.
You know, this is the best description of the method I have yet to see. Thanks, Corncob.
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Old 01-21-2012, 01:29 AM   #25
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No problem. Partygyling is awesome, and I am its disciple.
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Old 01-21-2012, 03:38 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corncob
Do you normally batch sparge, Mpavlik22?

I ask because, from what you posted, it looks like you are planning to run off the first runnings with just the water you doughed in with. As far as I know, you mash in with enough water ti get your grist ratio right, then you add enough at the end of the mash to make your first runnings the volume you want them to be. Then run off untill dry, and add the sparge water.
Is there any reasoning as to why you wouldn't want to mash in with the total boil volume of your big beer? I would think that this would give you the advantage of having a thinner mash, which would lead to a more fermentable wort. And since it is going to be a high gravity beer, you would want it to be highly fermentable to let the yeast do their business.

 
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Old 01-21-2012, 02:18 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corncob
Do you normally batch sparge, Mpavlik22?

I ask because, from what you posted, it looks like you are planning to run off the first runnings with just the water you doughed in with. As far as I know, you mash in with enough water ti get your grist ratio right, then you add enough at the end of the mash to make your first runnings the volume you want them to be. Then run off untill dry, and add the sparge water.
Thank you! Crystal clear. Now I understand. That's what I was asking.
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Old 01-21-2012, 08:56 PM   #28
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How do you predict the color of the beers that will be produced when using this method? Or do you simply throw your grains in and go for it?

 
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Old 01-21-2012, 08:59 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HollisBT View Post
How do you predict the color of the beers that will be produced when using this method? Or do you simply throw your grains in and go for it?
If I gather correctly, some keep an amount of carafa or other color giving malt on-hand to steep with after mashing. I think it is usually the small beer that suffers in this respect.
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Old 01-22-2012, 12:19 AM   #30
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Quote:
Is there any reasoning as to why you wouldn't want to mash in with the total boil volume of your big beer? I would think that this would give you the advantage of having a thinner mash, which would lead to a more fermentable wort. And since it is going to be a high gravity beer, you would want it to be highly fermentable to let the yeast do their business.
I don't know about the thin vs. thick mash argument. I am always brewing English ales, and I mash at 1 qt./lb because they do, or did, at least, based on what I read at Shut Up About Barclay Perkins.

Quote:
How do you predict the color of the beers that will be produced when using this method? Or do you simply throw your grains in and go for it?
I don't know. I have read some about it on the net, but it looks like maybe there isn't a very good model and you just have to experiment. I usually do 12 gallons as 2 6-gallon gyles, blended to make a 1.040-ish and a 1.060-ish beer. The second gyle is way paler. If the first is copper, the second will be golden, for instance, and way more tannic. Also, the second gyle will always have about 30% of the total mash sugars.
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