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Old 01-15-2012, 09:30 PM   #21
HollisBT
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How necessary is it to hold it at 90 degrees? And what did you use to keep that temperature for 24 hours?

 
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Old 01-16-2012, 12:52 PM   #22
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I think that keeping it at a higher temp is crucial for the lacto. I cooled the beer down to 100 and then used a fermawrap inside of a fermentation chamber. If you don't have that, you could always use a heating pad.

I once tried to keep it at 90F for two days. That beer was way too sour and I had to back sweeten it in the keg.

 
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:49 PM   #23
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I kept mine just under 90 using a tub of water with an aquarium heater in it. I'd recently broken my 150w heater and my 75w one couldn't get it to 90. I still experienced what weremichael did. I've been drinking mine mixed with various syrups to cut the acidity.
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Old 01-16-2012, 01:58 PM   #24
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So then maybe if I just wanting slightly tart, keeping it at those temps isn't as important?

 
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Old 01-16-2012, 03:54 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weremichael View Post
I think that keeping it at a higher temp is crucial for the lacto. I cooled the beer down to 100 and then used a fermawrap inside of a fermentation chamber. If you don't have that, you could always use a heating pad.

I once tried to keep it at 90F for two days. That beer was way too sour and I had to back sweeten it in the keg.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
I kept mine just under 90 using a tub of water with an aquarium heater in it. I'd recently broken my 150w heater and my 75w one couldn't get it to 90. I still experienced what weremichael did. I've been drinking mine mixed with various syrups to cut the acidity.
Were these sour mashes (where you boiled afterward to kill the lacto) or did you pitch pure lacto for a few days and then pitch a regular strain on top of that and let it ferment out?

 
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Old 01-16-2012, 03:57 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airborneguy View Post
I just started drinking my berliner weisse in the last week, and actually had my first commercial version yesterday.

Mine was brewed no boil, with a double decoction. I pitched a 500ml starter of lacto that I cultivated from grains, then a smack pack of Wyeast Kolsch 3 days later. I ended up with a ridiculously sour beer, WAY over the top.

Next time, I'm going to make a smaller starter of lacto and pitch it only 1 day before pitching the yeast. I still want the lacto to get a head start, but this one practically finished the race!

I left it in the primary for approximately 2 months, skimmed off the pellicle and then cold-crashed in my freezer for 3 days. If you cold-crash, expect the beer to carbonate really slow if you naturally carb. Next time, I am going to keg this beer after my cold-crash.
Here's my whole process (prior post).
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Old 01-16-2012, 04:12 PM   #27
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I would suggest using lactobacillus brevis instead of delbrueckii, or doing the sour starter method. The Delbrueckii strains are notorious for being very slow to sour and tend to be extremely sensitive to even very low levels of hopping.

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 10:33 PM   #28
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Subscribed. I was just about to ask at least 3 of these questions.
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:15 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ArcaneXor
I would suggest using lactobacillus brevis instead of delbrueckii, or doing the sour starter method. The Delbrueckii strains are notorious for being very slow to sour and tend to be extremely sensitive to even very low levels of hopping.
What exactly are the differences between the strains? Do they produce any different flavor/aroma characteristics? I have the same question about Brett, and have yet to find a solid resource to explain it.

 
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Old 01-20-2012, 11:47 PM   #30
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I'm fairly sure that some of the lacto strains do not produce any alcohol at all.
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