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Old 01-12-2012, 05:29 PM   #11
Fritobandito
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
I have made 2 BW batches, and this was my experience both times. I think I'm done with the style - it beat me
I remember you helping me in a thread I made about mine not being sour a while ago. Don't throw in the towel yet!



 
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Old 01-12-2012, 05:31 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by HokieBrewer View Post
When did you brew it?
Probably around 4 months ago. I'm at school, so I don't have my any of my notes with me. It stopped at 1.010, so I'm probably gonna throw some brett in shortly with some maltodextrin.



 
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Old 01-12-2012, 06:05 PM   #13
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I just started drinking my berliner weisse in the last week, and actually had my first commercial version yesterday.

Mine was brewed no boil, with a double decoction. I pitched a 500ml starter of lacto that I cultivated from grains, then a smack pack of Wyeast Kolsch 3 days later. I ended up with a ridiculously sour beer, WAY over the top.

Next time, I'm going to make a smaller starter of lacto and pitch it only 1 day before pitching the yeast. I still want the lacto to get a head start, but this one practically finished the race!

I left it in the primary for approximately 2 months, skimmed off the pellicle and then cold-crashed in my freezer for 3 days. If you cold-crash, expect the beer to carbonate really slow if you naturally carb. Next time, I am going to keg this beer after my cold-crash.
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Old 01-12-2012, 06:14 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fritobandito View Post
I remember you helping me in a thread I made about mine not being sour a while ago. Don't throw in the towel yet!
Thanks for the encouragement. I've got a bunch in bottles, and a single keg of it. I'll probably dump the keg, but I'll keep the bottles for a while longer - at least until summer.

Thing is, if I want a sour beer I've been very successful with flanders reds. I might as well make more of those.
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by tonyolympia
Is it commonly understood that a Berliner Weisse must remain in primary for multiple months? I recently listened to a Basic Brewing podcast with Michael Tonsmire, and I think his beer was in primary for at least 2 months, and in this thread I'm seeing 5-6 months. Yet in Brewing Classic Styles, Jamil makes NO mention of an extended fermentation.

What's the scoop with souring? Should I brew a Berliner Weisse now if I want to drink it in the summer?
My understanding was that all bacterial work slower than yeast when it comes to eating sugars and producing their desired effects. Mi planned on giving mine several months so that I could make sure I got the effect that I wanted. I want mine to be slightly tart, but not over the top bitter, just something that will be light and refreshing on a summers day. I am planning on brewing mine either this month or early February so that it will be ready to drink by July.

I also plan on doing the same with a Saison that I want to pitch Brett and pedio on.

 
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Old 01-12-2012, 08:53 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyolympia View Post
Is it commonly understood that a Berliner Weisse must remain in primary for multiple months? I recently listened to a Basic Brewing podcast with Michael Tonsmire, and I think his beer was in primary for at least 2 months, and in this thread I'm seeing 5-6 months. Yet in Brewing Classic Styles, Jamil makes NO mention of an extended fermentation.

What's the scoop with souring? Should I brew a Berliner Weisse now if I want to drink it in the summer?
Kristen England (eminent brewer) recommends just the opposite. He gets his BW into bottles within 7 days of brewing. He adds more lacto when he bottles. Then he puts the bottles away in a hot place (say, garage) for many months. He says he gets lots of sour this way.

I did it like this on my last batch (I didn't add more lacto, didn't see the point) and had the same result as when I fermented for 5 months in carboy. Oh well. One interesting thing on the 1st batch: I never got a pellicle in the carboy, but within 2 days the bottles formed pellicles in the neck.
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Old 01-13-2012, 01:35 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by passedpawn View Post
Kristen England (eminent brewer) recommends just the opposite. He gets his BW into bottles within 7 days of brewing. He adds more lacto when he bottles. Then he puts the bottles away in a hot place (say, garage) for many months. He says he gets lots of sour this way.

I did it like this on my last batch (I didn't add more lacto, didn't see the point) and had the same result as when I fermented for 5 months in carboy. Oh well. One interesting thing on the 1st batch: I never got a pellicle in the carboy, but within 2 days the bottles formed pellicles in the neck.
So why don't you have worry about bottle-bombs when you do this does lacto never produce CO2, just acid? Making the Brett the major difference (and bottle-bomb causer) between this and other sours?

 
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Old 01-13-2012, 03:39 AM   #18
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So what exactly is the purpose of the decoction in the mash with this style?

Also, if pitching the lacto first do you wait to see activity before adding the saccharomyces? Do you have to worry about pellicle formation and oxidation?

 
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Old 01-13-2012, 04:08 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by othellomcbane View Post
So why don't you have worry about bottle-bombs when you do this does lacto never produce CO2, just acid? Making the Brett the major difference (and bottle-bomb causer) between this and other sours?
Good question. You do have to worry about bombs. Lacto is not homofermentive (I think that's the right term), so it does produce CO2.

I don't have a good answer for you. It's a small beer, so it's really done fermenting quickly. I put lacto in there and the beer raged just like an active sacc fermentation.
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Old 01-15-2012, 08:49 PM   #20
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I've had success with a 15 min boil onto a lacto starter (made with apple juice) and held at 90F for 24 hrs, let it drop to 68F, transfer and pitch a clean yeast AND some Brett and ferment for at least three months. Sour and tasty at that point. Might want to try it that way.



 
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