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Old 01-10-2012, 03:14 PM   #1
ZeroSum79
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Default Fermented for a week, then stopped.

Really looking for some help here. This is my first attempt ever at making Hard Cider.

Within a day of mixing my cider, malt sugar and yeast I had fermentation. Went great for a week, then I noticed slowing in the bubbling. Now it has completely stopped. I was concerned about the temperature, so I took a reading and it was near 90 degrees. Have I damaged the yeast? Do I need to cool it all the way down and start again? Add more yeast? I could use any help from the veterans.


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Old 01-10-2012, 03:16 PM   #2
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it may not be stopped but done. what does your hygrometer say??? at 90º you may have fermented out all the sugar in a week.


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Old 01-10-2012, 10:29 PM   #3
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I don't have a hygrometer. Like I said, still new. Not really sure all the supplies I need. IF the sugar is fermented out, does that effect the process? Is it done or do I need to add another step to get back on track? Thanks for the help.
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:34 PM   #4
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I'd say it's done heat might of worked the ueast like a champ
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Old 01-10-2012, 10:35 PM   #5
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you need to get a hygrometer to know for sure, good news is it won't cost you more than $10.00. how does it taste?? If it is done you can bottle it still and dry,prime and bottle carbonate (still dry), stabilize and back sweeten (sweet but still), OR you can back sweeten bottle carb and then pasteurize to end up with a sweet carbonated beverage.
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Old 01-10-2012, 11:28 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daze View Post
it may not be stopped but done. what does your hygrometer say???
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeroSum79 View Post
I don't have a hygrometer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daze View Post
you need to get a hygrometer to know for sure
Ummmm...

A hyGrometer measures the amount of moisture in the air.

A hyDrometer measures the specific gravity of a liquid.

Pretty sure you'd be better off with a hyDrometer...
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Oh, and get a hydrometer. Psychic brewing is great and all, but hard numbers get rid of MUCH of the guess work.
"No longer drink only water, but use a little wine for your stomach’s sake and your frequent infirmities." ~ 1 Timothy 5:23
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Old 01-11-2012, 01:17 PM   #7
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For the next batch, I wouldn't let it get anywhere near 90 degrees. For comparison, I ferment in the low 60's.
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Old 01-11-2012, 01:33 PM   #8
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For the next batch, I wouldn't let it get anywhere near 90 degrees. For comparison, I ferment in the low 60's.
+10 on that one. 90 degrees when fermenting anything, let alone a fruit is about 20-25 degree too high.
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Old 01-11-2012, 01:58 PM   #9
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I think a lot of wine yeasts have a fermentation range up close to 90º F (at least mid 80s) I think lalvin even has a strain that can withstand temps up to mid 90s. If you don't have any way to reduce the ambient temps for making cider, I'd probably opt for a wine yeast that's better suited for higher temps. By using a yeast with a temp range of say 55ºF - 75ºF, you might get some off flavors at 15+º over the suggested range.

That all said...you might end up with a beverage you are very happy with regardless.
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Old 01-11-2012, 02:12 PM   #10
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I can understand the need to ferment at high temps for those living in some warmer climates, but the OP is fermenting in Washington in January. Shouldn't be too difficult to ferment at a lower temp.


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