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Old 01-07-2012, 05:09 PM   #1
barrooze
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I've heard from a few sources that dogs are allergic to hops as well as sources that report the contrary (the Hops and Dogs thread on this site). My question is this: if dogs ARE allergic to hops, what part of the hop vine (bine?) would be allergic to dogs? Are people who say that dogs aren't allergic to hops just referring to the leaves/cones from which pellets are made or are all parts of the vine safe for dogs?

I've got some pretty small dogs (< 10#) and think that if there is an unsafe part of the plant that it wouldn't take as much to affect my dogs.

Thanks!
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:15 PM   #2
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They're not allergic to hops. If they ingest it the hops have effects similar to neurotoxins (i.e. paralysis and seizures, also vomiting). As for the part of the plant... if there is any question you should treat the entire plant as poisonous. Get some deer fence to put around them. Don't mess around or second-guess yourself when it comes to your dogs safety.
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Old 01-07-2012, 06:27 PM   #3
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The toxin severely dehydrates the dog. Not sure if the whole plant or just the cones have the toxin. I suspect everything has it to a varying degree, with the cones being the most poisonous.

I've had bines growing in the yard before and I dump my spent hops out on the grass. My dog has zero interest in them. Most of the time when I hear a dog has eaten hops it was because the hops were dumped on the spent grain and the dog wanted to eat the grain.

My dog does not just start eating random plants though, some do.
If you think they will eat them some chicken wire should set your mind at ease.

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Old 01-08-2012, 01:24 AM   #4
barrooze
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reno_eNVy View Post
They're not allergic to hops. If they ingest it the hops have effects similar to neurotoxins (i.e. paralysis and seizures, also vomiting). As for the part of the plant... if there is any question you should treat the entire plant as poisonous. Get some deer fence to put around them. Don't mess around or second-guess yourself when it comes to your dogs safety.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brewingmeister View Post
The toxin severely dehydrates the dog. Not sure if the whole plant or just the cones have the toxin. I suspect everything has it to a varying degree, with the cones being the most poisonous.
I agree with both of you. Since we can't determine what the greatest threat is, treat it all as a threat. That being said, should I even contemplate growing hops? My guess is no. But, as you guys mentioned, do my dogs actually eat vegetation that I currently have? No, not really. Do hop bines shed leaves very often? If so, a fence won't likely keep the fallen leaves out of the dog's way. My dogs don't typically eat fallen leaves, so this isn't too much of an issue for me, but it may be for others. We have a neighbor that has oleander trees which are also said to be poisonous to dogs, and our dogs avoid those fallen leaves consistently, so maybe a little bit of hop vegitation isn't all that bad of a thing...

I do appreciate your input. I'm less opposed to growing my own hops at home now. Thanks!
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Old 01-08-2012, 08:21 AM   #5
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The only thing that I can contribute is that last year my dog completely ignored my hop plant. And in previous years, my last dog also ignored them. YMMV, and since you don't want your mileage to vary to the extent that your pup chows down on some hops, use caution!

 
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Old 01-08-2012, 10:30 AM   #6
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The hop cone is the issue. It causes malignant hyperthermia, which leads to seizures, dehydration, and brain damage. Ultimately leading in death. Leaves and bines aren't the issue, as far as anything I've ever seen.

I'm not actually sure what has lead to any "mystery" here.

They aren't inclined to eat them usually, but I wouldn't put them in a place the dog frequents if you have other options. You might consider cages or baskets around the plant. Curious, chewy dogs are likely to be more of a problem.

Hops and Dogs | Brewer's Friend

Spent hops seem to be more of a problem, as they've got sweet wort on them, or at least that is one theory.

 
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Old 01-08-2012, 03:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ResumeMan View Post
The only thing that I can contribute is that last year my dog completely ignored my hop plant. And in previous years, my last dog also ignored them. YMMV, and since you don't want your mileage to vary to the extent that your pup chows down on some hops, use caution!
Same here....mine haven't touched mine in the 4 years I've had them.
Just don't let them get into the spent hops from your kettle. I think that is the most likely place for them to ingest hops.

 
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Old 01-09-2012, 02:22 PM   #8
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You might find this interesting/useful:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/dang...s-dogs-108663/
Regards, GF.

 
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Old 01-09-2012, 02:45 PM   #9
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I always find these thread kind of interesting; everyone is so worried about hops making fido sick but never think about their houseplants that are pretty much all poisonious/toxic to pets, the food in our pantries/cupboards that are toxic to dogs (baking chocolate, raisens, etc), or the the multiple plastic parts that are strewn around their house that could be chewed and ingested to cause a blockage.

 
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Old 01-09-2012, 03:53 PM   #10
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I've done my best to comb the interwebs to find more info. Seeing as I live on a hop farm and have an awesome dog, this was of some concern to me.

The facts as I've been able to find them:
1: Ingestion of hops by dogs causes hyperthermia ( as stated and better explained above)
2: The cone and the chemicals therein seem to be the prime culprit
3: There are only 9 reported cases of dogs dying from hop ingestion
4: 8 of these cases were greyhounds, the other a lab mix

So based on that info, it would seem that this is extremely rare, especially among non-greyhounds. Also, in my experience on the hop farm, dogs have no inclination to eat hops. Mixed in spent grains would seem to be the only way they'd do it, and even that seems to almost never happen.

My conclusion: RDWHAHB

 
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