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Old 01-07-2012, 04:15 AM   #11
Calder
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Mar 2010
Ohio
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Originally Posted by Burgs View Post
Sounds good, thanks! What's your reasoning behind acid malt - just complementary to the flavor the brett provides? Or are you looking for some kind of sourness/tartness?
Brett works better in acidic worts. Adding the acid malt is to help with the Brett along, nothing to do with adding any sourness. Personally I can't notice the contribution of a half pound of acid malt in a regular beer.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 04:21 PM   #12
Burgs
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Feb 2010
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Originally Posted by thebadpun View Post
If you are looking for something along the lines of Jolly Pumpkin funk/sourness with a relatively quick (~4-6 weeks) turnaround, I suggest you check out the "Can You Brew It" episode where they clone Bam Biere. I've brewed the recipe twice with Bam dregs in the secondary/keg. Both of my batches resulted in a beer that was refreshing, mildly tart, fruity, and funky (especially as the bottles aged).
I will check that out - I love Bam Biere. Thanks

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 04:21 PM   #13
Burgs
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Feb 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
Brett works better in acidic worts. Adding the acid malt is to help with the Brett along, nothing to do with adding any sourness. Personally I can't notice the contribution of a half pound of acid malt in a regular beer.
Gotcha - I am doing 2.5 gal batches so will scale that back, but will definitely try it out.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 04:22 PM   #14
Burgs
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Feb 2010
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Do you guys also tend to mash pretty high on 100% brett fermentations?

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:15 PM   #15
Calder
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Mar 2010
Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burgs View Post
Do you guys also tend to mash pretty high on 100% brett fermentations?
NO! In 100% beers, Brett acts very similarly to regular yeast, but adds a lot more flavor. It is not more attenuative; if anything it is less attenuative than most regular yeasts. I get somewhere between 70 and 75% attenuation.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:23 PM   #16
Sebas83
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Jun 2010
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Depends on how much Brett flavor you want and when you want to pitch it. More sugars available that the yeast can't chew, the more Brett.

Turbid mashing and Berliner weisse mashes are all super low and leave a LOT of weird sugars in the wort. Saison mashes are typically low, but bretting browns, etc are higher. Different points of pitching and flavor characteristics drive that decision.

If Brett is your backbone, yes. If its just a component, maybe.

Brett is fun!!

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:40 PM   #17
Calder
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Mar 2010
Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebas83 View Post
Depends on how much Brett flavor you want and when you want to pitch it. More sugars available that the yeast can't chew, the more Brett.

Turbid mashing and Berliner weisse mashes are all super low and leave a LOT of weird sugars in the wort. Saison mashes are typically low, but bretting browns, etc are higher. Different points of pitching and flavor characteristics drive that decision.

If Brett is your backbone, yes. If its just a component, maybe.

Brett is fun!!
He is looking to use Brett as the primary yeast, not as a secondary yeast.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:55 PM   #18
Sebas83
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Yup. Just illustrating the variety of options even in Brett primaries ie, no set way.

A high mash might leave some sugars that may result in a dubious gravity reading when approaching TG. With those beers, i would forget about them, and then forget some more until they're down to 1003-1001. Whereas a lower mash, you know those sugars are highly fermentable and will get down to TG relatively quickly.

I would treat mashing as normal. What kind of body do you want? It will be different with Brett, of course. But a similar process as using sacch.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 06:54 PM   #19
Burgs
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I imagine I'll be brewing beers that I'd want a light-medium body in. If I treat it as a normal saach beer, they'd be recipes I'd mash at 149-152. I plan on doing a lot of paler beers like saisons, blonde, and patersbier.

 
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Old 01-07-2012, 07:11 PM   #20
Sebas83
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Jun 2010
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Perfect. I think you'll be happy mashing low for those guys. Especially if you have Brett in the primary. For that extra "chewiness" consider adding rye and oats to you your bill as opposed to higher mashing. That will keep that lightness around while maintaining body.

I have a black saison that I mashed low (147), then added partially caramelized figs to the primary. I pitched a high krausen saison yeast with a slow Brett (propped up from Tired Hands Wachu Saison). It is just kicking ass right now!! Really fruity and tropical with that Brett leather in there.

 
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