Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Rehydradting Safale 04
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-27-2011, 07:57 PM   #1
y2jrock60
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 100
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Rehydradting Safale 04

Last week I brewed an IPA and pitched Safale 05 directly on top of the wort after aeration without re-hydrating the yeast. My OG was really high because I ended up with less wort than I predicted. It took about 2 1/2 days before fermentation kicked off. I was worried that the yeast was pitched at a too high of temperature, but it looks like everything is going to be fine.

I plan on making a Northern English Brown Ale tomorrow and plan on using Safale 04. I was wondering how much water I need to boil to rehydrate the yeast and at what temperature.

I was originally planing to make a starter from from liquid yeast two days ago, but the brewstore was closed. Rather than making the starter with less than 24hours before pitching I'm just going to use dry yeast. Plus I don't feel like paying 7 dollars for yeast I'm only going to use once. I would like to get into yeast harvesting, but I would like to get the proper jars and equipment before I start.


y2jrock60 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 08:12 PM   #2
dallasdb
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 1,208
Liked 53 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I remember reading somewhere that you don't want to boil water before rehydrating as the yeasties need the minerals or something in the non-boiled water.

Anyways, my method is to get my sink water hot and put 2 cups in a glass measuring cup. When the temp is around 90 degrees I put the yeast in and stir it up. Then let it sit for about 20 minutes while I'm cooling the wort. Aerate the wort then pitch.

Airlock usually starts bubbling in ~8-12 hours

Hope this helps.


dallasdb is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 08:23 PM   #3
ACbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
Posts: 1,618
Liked 105 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

The boild water is a t 212F ... although that probably wasn't what you were asking.

Rehydration temps are anywhere from about 90 to 105F. Aim for the 105 area. The yeast rehydrate best around there (ie more make it back to life). The yeast will come back at even 70 or 60, only you get less then at 105. Much above 105 will begin to kill yeast. When you pitch to the wort, make sure that the two are about the same temp (ie wort is about 70, then your yeast around 70 +/- a bit).

Also I think rehyration time is like 30 mins. Much more than that, and the yeast have consumed all their reserves of food and begin to lose some of their vitality.

Or do a starter.
ACbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 08:24 PM   #4
Grinder12000
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Columbus WI
Posts: 2,953
Liked 39 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

In BYO there was an article about rehydrating and with side by side tests brews came out BETTER without rehydrating.

I've never hydrated dry yeast with no bad results . . . . just sayin. But that was before I made starters!
__________________
Grinders Island Brewery - Pipeline

138 batches and counting

European IPA bottled, One Putt 12 IPA carbing. East Indian Porter on tap. Looking into a Saffon Beer
Grinder12000 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 08:28 PM   #5
ACbrewer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
Posts: 1,618
Liked 105 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Grinder - that's a good point about rehydration. I usually follow the manufacturer's label. What I posted aboved is pretty much from 'Yeast' but I figure the manufacturer knows his yeast, so that's why I go with what they say. I don't remember what Safeale recomends.
ACbrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 10:28 PM   #6
Taypo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Wylie, TX
Posts: 352
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts

Default

We started out rehydryating dry, then switched to pitching straight and didnt really notice any differences in lag time or taste.
__________________
Primary: Innkeeper
Secondary: Dawson's Kriek, Wee Heavy
Bottled: Spiced Holiday Ale,
Drinking: Moose Drool Clone, Irish Red, Oaked Whiskey Vanilla Porter, Milk Stout, NB Innkeeper Kit (West Yorkshire), NB Mild Ale (West Yorkshire), American Wheat
Planning: Irish Red, Patersbier,
Taypo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2011, 11:06 PM   #7
ChillWill
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sheffield, South Yorkshire
Posts: 869
Liked 20 Times on 17 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

There are millions of factors to consider when using dry yeast.

You shouldn't oxygenate wort with dry yeast
You should rehydrate
Boil water first to kill bacteria
Don't use RO or distilled water as osmotic shock will lower viability

So many variables... so little time.

A lot of people get low viability by not rehydrating, but then oxygenate wort to get more growth out of the live cells, which stops them noticing negative results.
ChillWill is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2011, 07:57 PM   #8
y2jrock60
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 100
Liked 5 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I ended up boiling 1 cup of water, which boiled down to about 2/3 cup, chilled it in an ice bath, then pitched the yeast at around 90 degrees. I let it sit for 15 minutes then gave it a quick stir. After another 10 minutes my wort was cool enough to pitch. I shook my wort for about 5 minutes nonstop then pitched the yeast.

After about 12 hours later I have airlock activity every 2 seconds. My last batch took over 48 hours to show signs of active fermentation. I'm not sure if re-hydrating the yeast helped this time, of if it's because I under-pitched my first batch which had a high gravity of 1.075.

I'm going to make one more brew with dry yeast and will probably rehydrate it again. After that I'm going to start using liquid yeast with a proper starter and will eventually harvest and grow my own yeast.

I'm happy that I have 2 batches fermenting away in the closest. My big IPA is down to 1.020 from 1.075 after about 3-4 days of fermentation. The airlock is still bubbling about every ten seconds and there's still a thick layer of foam on top of the brew. If it get down to 1.015 or 1.010 by Sunday I will be happy.

Thanks for the help guys, I thought I would give you an update on my brews.


y2jrock60 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
(Un)SafAle US-05 Conan Fermentation & Yeast 18 05-27-2015 12:02 PM
safale Us-05 petrostar Fermentation & Yeast 7 10-12-2011 11:45 PM
Safale s-33 jonmohno Fermentation & Yeast 4 08-06-2011 01:28 AM
Safale s-04 Armen_Tamzarian Fermentation & Yeast 3 04-30-2011 10:45 PM
Safale - 05 with a 1.070 OG prjectmayhem Fermentation & Yeast 7 04-30-2011 02:22 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS