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Old 12-23-2011, 09:34 PM   #11
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I also primed my English bitter (ordinary bitter) to 1.3 volumes,& it was virtually flat with maybe 1 finger head. I was going to prime to at least 1.8 volumes next time. I use the tasty brew calculator myself. You have to look at the min-max on the list for that style when you click on it. Then you can go to the co2 volume box & set the number where you want it within range. I primed my Burton ale to 2.0 volumes.


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Old 10-29-2013, 02:07 PM   #12
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I'm bottling a English Old Ale and it says ot use 3.5 oz of sugar for that style. Seems low to. Why do they give you 5 oz bag of sugar with kits if yo're nly supposed to use 3.5 oz? I did not make this from a kit, so I need to buy priming sugar so if I buy a 5 oz bag I'll have some left over. Have I been over carbing my beers all along?


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Old 10-29-2013, 02:37 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PCharles View Post
William, 5 may be too much, but the 0.6 seems to be too little. That's what the style calculator says to do. The instruction sheet that comes with the kit is closer to your suggestion, 3 oz per 6 gallons. I feel comfortable that I will not be adding too much or too little.

Thanks
.6 oz for a 5 gal batch sounded so small..
I just had to look
but from one of the more popular priming calculators,http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html selecting a English Bitter, 5 gal batch size and carbing at 70 deg..
Sure enough the result calculated was just .5 oz
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Old 10-29-2013, 02:38 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by abbysdad2006 View Post
I'm bottling a English Old Ale and it says ot use 3.5 oz of sugar for that style. Seems low to. Why do they give you 5 oz bag of sugar with kits if yo're nly supposed to use 3.5 oz? I did not make this from a kit, so I need to buy priming sugar so if I buy a 5 oz bag I'll have some left over. Have I been over carbing my beers all along?
I hate those "priming calculators", as they have you prime to style. Well, that's fine if you're accustomed to flat English bitters, or to effervescent wits, but most people who buy bottled beer don't drink beer carbed "to style". Most commercial beers purchased in bottles are carbonated about the same.

I carb my beers with .75-1 ounce (by weight) of priming sugar per US gallon. I use the .75 ounce amount for beers that I want less carbed (but still carbed up!) and 1 ounce for more highly carbed beers. It works great for me, and I've never had an over-carbed or under-carbed batch!
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Old 10-29-2013, 02:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by E_Marquez View Post
.6 oz for a 5 gal batch sounded so small..
I just had to look
but from one of the more popular priming calculators, selecting a English Bitter, 5 gal batch size and carbing at 70 deg..
Sure enough the result calculated was just .5 oz
Well, yes. That "to style" calculator means the beer is flat. That may be desired in cask ale, but not in bottled beer.
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Old 10-29-2013, 02:43 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abbysdad2006 View Post
Why do they give you 5 oz bag of sugar with kits
Why, to sell you a 5oz bag of course..
And as that size package fits all of there kits... it's a economy of storage, logistics deal for them id bet.

As well as,, just because BJCP style guidelines say a style of beer is "supposed to be" xxx volumes of CO2.. if you like YOUR beer, that YOU made and YOU will be drinking at a higher CO2 level, then change that variable in the calculator and add the appropriate amount of priming sugar for YOUR tastes.
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Old 10-29-2013, 02:47 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Well, yes. That "to style" calculator means the beer is flat. That may be desired in cask ale, but not in bottled beer.
Oh I agree... it may be the "standard" but it would not be tasty and desirable to me...

As there was no selection option for a style of beer that was kegged, casked or bottled..in the calculator,,,the answer was accurate for what was available to choose from.

I like beer carbed at 2.50 or so,,, thats not according to anyone's standards but mine....so i prime to achieve that level (or keg and pressurize for the same effect)
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Old 10-29-2013, 02:52 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Most commercial beers purchased in bottles are carbonated about the same.
By chance do you know what that "most" level of carb is?

Vol of Co2 2.40? 2.30? 2.50?

Thanks
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Old 10-29-2013, 04:23 PM   #19
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I have to agree with yooper a bit here. I find I like EB's,ESB's & the like at 1.8-2.0 vco2. That 1.3 volumes isn't even as high as their bottled bitters. And 2.5 volumes is a good average for pale ales of all sorts. but my newer IPA's are getting 2.6 volumes just to see if it raises the bar a little on hop flavors & aromas.


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