When to use US-05 vs. S-04? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 12-22-2011, 05:00 AM   #1
StophJS
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After brewing several batches with both US-05 and S-04, one distinct thing that I've noticed about the 04 vs. the 05 is that the 04 compacts incredibly well and practically paints itself to the bottom of bottles. So I'm wondering, has anyone found any styles of beer where they really feel the US-05 is a much better choice? Otherwise I might just stick with the S-04 from now on.

Edit: Sorry, wrong forum section.



 
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Old 12-22-2011, 08:16 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StophJS View Post
After brewing several batches with both US-05 and S-04, one distinct thing that I've noticed about the 04 vs. the 05 is that the 04 compacts incredibly well and practically paints itself to the bottom of bottles. So I'm wondering, has anyone found any styles of beer where they really feel the US-05 is a much better choice? Otherwise I might just stick with the S-04 from now on.

Edit: Sorry, wrong forum section.
I use 04 for British Ales and 05 for American Ales. Never got more technical than that.


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Old 12-22-2011, 02:45 PM   #3
HomebrewMTB
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You'll get more bready yeast flavor with the S-04 where the US-05 is more clean. You might try Nottingham as well. It floccs well but still fairly clean but maybe not quite as crisp.

 
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Old 12-22-2011, 03:31 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Rider View Post
I use 04 for British Ales and 05 for American Ales. Never got more technical than that.
04 attenuates lower and will leave more residual sweetness. Also produces esters typical of English yeast.
05 is pretty clean, attenuates very well, thus drying out the beer.
Both floc pretty well, given enough time, but being English, the 04 will drop like a brick when it's done (or sometimes not quite done).
Hope that helps.
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Old 12-22-2011, 03:50 PM   #5
Diver165
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I've never noticed a bready flavor from S-04. I haven't really paid much attention. I like darker beers and it fits my palette. Now on the other hand, I use a lot of S-05 for my american style beers.

I tend to stick with what I like and the Fermentis S-04 and S-05 have worked well for me.

HomebrewMTB mentioned Nottingham. Never tried it in beer, but it makes a kickass cider! I make gallons of it each year. SWMBO and I love the way it always turns out.

 
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Old 12-22-2011, 04:04 PM   #6
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I previously thought S04 attenuates less than US05. But looking back I get close to 80% attenuation on beers mashed close to 150 with both strains.

I use SO4 if I want a little contribution to the malt/ester profile. But, for some styles like bitters, SO4 is too highly attenuating for me.

 
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Old 12-23-2011, 02:17 AM   #7
StophJS
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Thanks for the responses. I do really love the flocculation of S-04 but I could see how US-05 would be more appropriate for some styles.

 
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Old 12-23-2011, 02:57 AM   #8
duckmanco
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I'm thinking about switching from us05 to using Nottingham st 59f or so for American ales where I don't want any esters... I'm running into a peachy estery thing once in a while with us05 and id like to take that out of the equation.

 
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Old 12-23-2011, 03:03 AM   #9
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Us-05 tastes much better above 68 degrees than s-04 if thats an issue.

 
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Old 12-23-2011, 03:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diver165 View Post
I've never noticed a bready flavor from S-04. I haven't really paid much attention. I like darker beers and it fits my palette. Now on the other hand, I use a lot of S-05 for my american style beers.

I tend to stick with what I like and the Fermentis S-04 and S-05 have worked well for me.

HomebrewMTB mentioned Nottingham. Never tried it in beer, but it makes a kickass cider! I make gallons of it each year. SWMBO and I love the way it always turns out.
Bready probably isn't the best description but it's generally a little more noticeable flavor than US-05. S-04 is supposed to be a bit less attenuating but that can vary. As always it depends on the fermentation temp on exactly what you get out of the yeasties. I've mostly used S-04 in stouts where the flavor is less noticeable, than say a pale ale. It's not a huge night and day difference though. If doing all grain, you could adjust mash temps a bit to get whatever attenuation range you want but with extract, you get what you get.



 
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