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Old 12-13-2011, 06:51 AM   #11
EndlessWinter77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hopheaded View Post
sirachi
Could we all agree that the correct name of the sauce is "Sriracha" though... unless for some reason I am mistaken and there is some weird ingredient known as "Sirachi".

Sorry, for some reason its just driving me nuts



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Old 12-13-2011, 07:08 AM   #12
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Sriracha it is...I ussually just call it rooster sauce though


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Old 12-13-2011, 10:57 PM   #13
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Yeah I have had a couple dif jalapeno ipa's that were good. I'm going for some heat but also for the flavor of the sirrachi that's why I don't just want to use a pepper.
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Old 12-13-2011, 11:00 PM   #14
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Endlesswinter sorry I didn't have a bottle in front of me. Lol. Why argue semantic's just looking for input on the idea
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Old 12-14-2011, 02:17 AM   #15
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It's actually known as Cock Sauce.
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Old 12-14-2011, 02:27 AM   #16
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FWIW, this is a made-in-the-USA, CA derived sauce. It is not a true, traditional asian sauce. It think it was created by an asian transplant to CA, but just putting it out there.

Either way, I love heat. I made a habenero/ancho porter that was pretty good. It took second in a local competition in it's category.

IMHO the secret is smoothing the flavor distinction between the heat and the barley/hops. Anchos do this with dark grains because they add a little smoke and a little heat. You can try to figure out what to do with a red pepper sauce, but you are probably better off going back to actual peppers. It's easier to control the flavor with fewer ingredients (like garlic, as above) affecting the taste.
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Old 12-14-2011, 05:32 AM   #17
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Yeah I know it will be tricky to balance the flavor with those other ingredients that are in the sauce but I want to try something diffrent from what everyone else is doing and I really enjoy the flavor of the sauce and want some of that to.come through not just the heat
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Old 12-14-2011, 06:07 AM   #18
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Ayoungrad...when you did the anchos in the porter did you add them at the end of the boil or do a dry hop thing with them? I made a habenero/pepper beer where i did both, serano peppers for 15 mins and habs in the secondary. The beer had an over poweing pepper taste, like drinking a bell pepper. What was your method?
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Old 12-14-2011, 01:10 PM   #19
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I dry hopped both the habaneros and the anchos. I just chopped them and put everything, including the seeds, in a hop bag. Then I tested it every day or two until I had the heat level and flavor I was looking for. My Puerto Rican mother-in-law loved it.

I just remembered something. Have you ever had a michelada? I had some in Mexico and have since had them here. It's basically beer, lime juice and spices. The spices I had were mainly hot sauces, probably because its easier to make. And I had one in MA that had sriracha in it at an asian restaurant. It was really good. I think micheladas are most often made with lagers. The ones I had in Mexico were made with Pacifico.

Also, I just double-checked my sriracha comment above. According to wiki, it IS a traditional thai sauce. Not sure where I heard otherwise. Oh well. Bottom line is I always have at least sriracha, cholula, tabasco and el yucateco on hand. And usually several others.


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