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Old 12-08-2011, 03:38 PM   #1
Lancer
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Nov 2011
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Anyone have any experience with Rauchbier?...we currently are adept at making a Czech style lager, & wanted to experiment in this direction?...any nuggets of wisdom will be greatly appreciated!

 
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Old 12-08-2011, 04:40 PM   #2
BoundForBeer
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Nov 2010
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Never can use enough Rauchmalt!!! doing a 100% one when I free up room in the fermentor chamber

 
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Old 12-08-2011, 07:02 PM   #3
wyoohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BoundForBeer View Post
Never can use enough Rauchmalt!!!
Agreed. I love Rauchbier. It is very unique. Also, the smell on brewday is awesome.

Side note, boil some brats, onions and peppers in some if you can spare it.
Then grill after that. Best brats I have ever had.

 
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Old 12-08-2011, 07:15 PM   #4
brrman
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Rauchbier is great, but there are lots of different variations - some use only 15% rauchmalt, others go up to 100%.

It is not for everyone though - some people hate it. But it ages really well, and after a year in the bottle it tastes velvety smokey. I have a batch on deck right now - has about 35% rauchmalt.
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Old 12-08-2011, 08:08 PM   #5
asterix404
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From reading about it basically I follow these guides:

10% will add a hint of smoke
20% will add a moderate amount, you can taste it
30% you can taste smoke, smell smoke, and basically it covers everything else except for very strong flavors

There are two types of smoked malt available, peat smoked and wyermanns beach smoked malt. You only want to use wyermanns for this beer. Peat smoke is very heavy. I recently made a smoked heff and I only added 10% and couldn't really taste it but others could. I would think starting off with a light flavored beer and doing like, 20% of the bill as smoke would be a good starting point?

 
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Old 12-08-2011, 08:28 PM   #6
CTownBrewer
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They've recently come out with a 3rd smoked malt...Briess Cherrywood Smoked Malt. I used it in a smoked rye & it gave it a sweeter subtle smoke character.

The main thing to note is to make sure you're getting fresh grain if you're making a smoked beer of any kind. I used more cherrywood smoked malt than a lot of recipes I researched & mine came out very subtle. Other people who used less said they got an intense smoke character. The only explanation I can think of for this is that mine was sitting for awhile on a shelf somewhere.
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Old 12-08-2011, 08:35 PM   #7
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never mind
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Old 12-09-2011, 02:00 AM   #8
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My last brew was 98% Weyermann Smoked, 2% Weyermann Carafa II Special dehusked.

I love it, but it is only about half as smokey as Schlenkerla Marzen.

 
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Old 12-09-2011, 03:31 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asterix404 View Post
From reading about it basically I follow these guides:

10% will add a hint of smoke
20% will add a moderate amount, you can taste it
30% you can taste smoke, smell smoke, and basically it covers everything else except for very strong flavors

There are two types of smoked malt available, peat smoked and wyermanns beach smoked malt. You only want to use wyermanns for this beer. Peat smoke is very heavy. I recently made a smoked heff and I only added 10% and couldn't really taste it but others could. I would think starting off with a light flavored beer and doing like, 20% of the bill as smoke would be a good starting point?
I would add that

Austin Brewing has a Mesquite Smoked malt. I have a pound have not used it anything.

MidWest has a cherry wood smoked malt. I used 1/2 lb in a 1.75 gallon batch and there is a nice hint of it there.
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Old 12-09-2011, 03:47 AM   #10
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Sorta repeating everyone, but...

If you like Schlenkerla Marzen, just go 100% smoked malt. Trust me on this. (BTW, to really get close, you need to smoke your own malt, preferably Munich, and use it 100% in your mash).

If you want a sweeter Bacon'y flavor, try using the Briess Cherrywood malt. Quite different from Weyermann Beechwood malt.

I've smoked ales, but for a good smokebeer you need to use a lager yeast, ferment cold, and age at cold temps for a while.
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