Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > How long until cold crashing a starter?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-23-2011, 07:27 PM   #1
Kurisu
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Saskatoon, SK
Posts: 22
Default How long until cold crashing a starter?

I'm having trouble getting a clear answer on this.

When using a stir plate, how long should you wait until you cold crash it?
I can never seem to tell when a stir plate starter is finished. There's almost no krausen. How can you tell it's finished it's work and started building its reserves?

Then, I will cold crash, decant, and pitch to primary.

Later, I am also planning on using a 5l or 6l starter, crashing it and dividing up the cake and freezing them in glycerin as per this thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/do-...freeze-269488/

Thanks to anyone who can help get a definitive answer!


Kurisu is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2011, 07:44 PM   #2
samc
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 5,423
Liked 62 Times on 58 Posts
Likes Given: 29

Default

I always get a Krausen so I wait for it to drop. Hydrometer will tell you the story or by observing the yeast slurry at the bottom.


samc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2011, 07:50 PM   #3
Malticulous
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: St. George Utah
Posts: 4,184
Liked 69 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 80

Default

You want to wait until they go dormant so they can store up glycogen. They need that when they wake back up. There is no definitive answer but defiantly let it go at least one day after FG. Brewing Science and Practice has a graph for a stirred 12P fermentation showing maximum glycogen at 60 hours.

It's going to depend a lot on the size and gravity of starter, number of viable cells pitched, temperature and even the strain.
__________________
Everything is better with a beer.
Malticulous is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2011, 08:53 PM   #4
biestie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Marion, IA
Posts: 320
Liked 23 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

24 hours total is long enough.
biestie is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2011, 09:13 PM   #5
Kurisu
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Saskatoon, SK
Posts: 22
Default

Okay, two votes for hydrometer, which leads to another question: how do you take a hydrometer reading of a stir plate starter without taking a whole bunch of good yeast with it? Put it back in the starter?? (wouldn't that raise the risk of an infection, especially for yeasts that are going to be split up, stored, revived, etc.?)
Kurisu is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-23-2011, 09:28 PM   #6
biestie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Marion, IA
Posts: 320
Liked 23 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I'll defer to a microbiologist at Wyeast. He didn't specifically say how long was too long, but the way it sounds to me is that 24 hours is plenty. To me, in a starter, taking a gravity is a lot more trouble than it's worth.



biestie is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cold crashing a starter william_shakes_beer Fermentation & Yeast 3 11-30-2011 01:56 AM
New to cold crashing sivdrinks Fermentation & Yeast 4 05-04-2011 01:21 PM
cold crashing for too long? BrewsClues Fermentation & Yeast 14 04-24-2011 04:44 AM
Cold Crashing: How long? tamoore Fermentation & Yeast 10 05-11-2010 10:34 PM
Cold Crashing notiniowa Fermentation & Yeast 4 01-21-2010 11:34 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS