dishwasher pasteurize - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Cider Forum > dishwasher pasteurize

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-20-2011, 02:42 AM   #1
JoeyChopps
 
JoeyChopps's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2011
warner robins, ga
Posts: 1,369
Liked 280 Times on 190 Posts



Does anyone have a good walk through on this?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 02:56 AM   #2
UpstateMike
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Marion, NY
Posts: 931
Liked 161 Times on 92 Posts


My understanding is that you put the bottles in the dishwasher, no soap, no rinse agent, hot wash, and take them out when the wash cycle ends and before the drying cycle begins.

However, there seems to be some debate as to if the dishwasher gets hot enough. Some say they get 140 - 150 degrees, but I know some recommend 170 - 190 for pasteurization.

Something I just read: "Very noticeably - when you exceed 175F (give or take depending on the variety and condition of the apple) the pectin in the cider denatures and drops out of suspension. This results in a juice that is almost clarified on top but has a thick "cloud" of formerly suspended solids on the bottom. Several national brands of "natural style" apple juice (After The Fall and Knudsen's) have this appearance from time to time. Obviously this condition changes the look, "mouth feel", and taste of the juice and - to many cider makers - is absolutely undesirable for their product." ~ Cider pastuerization facts need to be put into perspective

So, I think I'm going stovetop at 170.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 03:11 AM   #3
JoeyChopps
 
JoeyChopps's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2011
warner robins, ga
Posts: 1,369
Liked 280 Times on 190 Posts


170? I read somewhere 190 in the pot and leave them in there for 10 mins is this ok?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 03:14 AM   #4
smh
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Posts: 162
Liked 5 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeyChopps
170? I read somewhere 190 in the pot and leave them in there for 10 mins is this ok?
Yeah, the theory is the temperature drops when you add te bottles.

On the same day I used the stovetop method stickied here and the dishwasher method with two different batches. The one I did in the dishwasher was already fermented out, so it was just a test. the ones from the dishwasher were not nearly as hot as the ones from the stove. I could easily touch them with my hands and was no way I could do that's with the others. It will depend on your dishwasher and hot water temp, but this test made me skeptical of the dishwasher method.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 03:20 AM   #5
JoeyChopps
 
JoeyChopps's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2011
warner robins, ga
Posts: 1,369
Liked 280 Times on 190 Posts


Cool ill stick with the stove top version so I am good thanks for the insight

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 04:52 PM   #6
hroth521
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Nov 2009
Chicago
Posts: 219
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateMike
My understanding is that you put the bottles in the dishwasher, no soap, no rinse agent, hot wash, and take them out when the wash cycle ends and before the drying cycle begins.

However, there seems to be some debate as to if the dishwasher gets hot enough. Some say they get 140 - 150 degrees, but I know some recommend 170 - 190 for pasteurization.

Something I just read: "Very noticeably - when you exceed 175F (give or take depending on the variety and condition of the apple) the pectin in the cider denatures and drops out of suspension. This results in a juice that is almost clarified on top but has a thick "cloud" of formerly suspended solids on the bottom. Several national brands of "natural style" apple juice (After The Fall and Knudsen's) have this appearance from time to time. Obviously this condition changes the look, "mouth feel", and taste of the juice and - to many cider makers - is absolutely undesirable for their product." ~ Cider pastuerization facts need to be put into perspective

So, I think I'm going stovetop at 170.
I had exploding bottles at 190 for 10 minutes. I've had none with 160 for 20 minutes. No pectin haze either. YMMV obviously.
__________________
Sirius Cider

"There are more old drunkards than old doctors." Benjamin Franklin

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 07:36 PM   #7
smh
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Posts: 162
Liked 5 Times on 3 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by hroth521

I had exploding bottles at 190 for 10 minutes. I've had none with 160 for 20 minutes. No pectin haze either. YMMV obviously.
Mine wasn't carbed so that probably has an affect. 160 for 20 is also a standard method. The stovetop sticky way just avoids having to carefully control heat.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 08:33 PM   #8
BoomerCreek
Recipes 
 
Sep 2010
Santa Cruz, CA, California
Posts: 101
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


Crank your hot water heater up before you do the dishwasher pasteurize. Is should get up to just under 160.
__________________
Boomer Creek Cider Co.

"They speak of my drinking but they never think of my thirst." -Scottish Proverb

 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 11:38 PM   #9
UpstateMike
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Marion, NY
Posts: 931
Liked 161 Times on 92 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by BoomerCreek View Post
Crank your hot water heater up before you do the dishwasher pasteurize. Is should get up to just under 160.
I guess the best way to check would be to run a thermometer through with a load of dishes, and check the temp in the middle of the cycle.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Open bottle of Whole Foods cider- need to pasteurize again?? Flarmonster Cider Forum 4 09-23-2011 08:28 PM
Should I pasteurize my cider? brewsochist Cider Forum 2 09-22-2011 12:10 AM
Carbing, Back Sweetening and the Dishwasher Schark Cider Forum 8 02-20-2011 09:58 PM
Dishwasher pasteurization? whino Cider Forum 5 12-22-2010 08:16 PM
Pasteurize moldy apple juice? DrJerm Cider Forum 1 01-28-2010 09:07 PM


Forum Jump