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Old 05-25-2012, 11:53 PM   #11
Scottkb
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A good rule of thumb for a mash is strike water is 12 degrees higher than desired mash temp. not perfect but will be pretty close and not kill all enzymatic reaction, which is most likely what happened, 176 -> 164 (you got 168) so for 154 about 166-8? you really don't want to use strike water over 168 ever, because it will shut down enzymatic reaction and once stopped it does not start again.
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Old 05-26-2012, 12:20 AM   #12
ajf
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I (and a lot of other people) don't preheat the mash tun and throw the preheating water away.
Instead, we heat the strike water to about 6 deg C ( 10 deg F) hotter than it needs to be, add it to the tun, and wait while it warms the tun and cools to the required strike temperature. When it has cooled to the desired strike temperature (which takes about 10 - 15 minutes), we add the grains, stir, and mash as usual.
You may want to try this on your next brew.

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Old 05-26-2012, 12:30 AM   #13
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You would have probably been fine if you didn't dump the preheat water.

 
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Old 05-26-2012, 12:44 AM   #14
wegz15
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I used to heat my water to about 175. I added for heat loss to the cooler and then the grain. Ended up at 153 almost every time.

Now I brew electric and use a pid. Best investment ever

 
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Old 11-12-2012, 02:14 AM   #15
bbriscoe
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I thought I had this problem just now - my recipe said to mash at 150. It seemed pretty close when I mashed in, and I left a candy thermometer in the tun for 90 mins and didn't open it. At the end, the thermometer said 160 at the top of the mash, but the first quart of runnings were 148. Is that bad?

Heat rises?
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:49 PM   #16
Rickthescot
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I just did the same thing using the POS thermometer that came with my turkey fryer. After my smoked ale has been in primary for 2 weeks I am still at 1.030 (OG was 1.041 as recipe predicted). Just did a check of the thermo and found that at boiling it reads 195 degrees. Damn! I think I may just bottle it anyways and see what happens. What do you guys think?

 
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:15 PM   #17
OG2620
 
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Sounds more like a fermentation problem than a mash temperature problem.

Mashing at the low end of the saccharification range should yield a drier wort, i.e. more fermentable sugars.

 
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Old 01-18-2013, 12:49 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OG2620 View Post
Mashing at the low end of the saccharification range should yield a drier wort, i.e. more fermentable sugars.
If his termometer is reading 17* low, then what he thought was 155 (guesstimation on what temp one might use), he was actually mashing at 172*, which would likely result in very few fermentable sugars, and a high FG.

What should you do? Bottle / keg it, and drink it. Study the way it tastes, and move forward to the next batch.
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Old 01-18-2013, 04:08 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadNewsBrewery

If his termometer is reading 17* low, then what he thought was 155 (guesstimation on what temp one might use), he was actually mashing at 172*, which would likely result in very few fermentable sugars, and a high FG.

What should you do? Bottle / keg it, and drink it. Study the way it tastes, and move forward to the next batch.
Math before coffee = fail.

You are correct! On both counts!

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