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Old 10-28-2011, 03:53 AM   #1
smallkiller
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Default My Irish Red Ale

5 gal Volume brew, 8LBS grainbill

Breiss Organic 2-row(crushed), 4LBS

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/b...c-2-row-1.html

Briess Caramel 80L(crushed), .50LBS 15%

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/b...ramel-80l.html

Breiss Carapils(crushed), .25LBS 5%

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/b...-carapils.html

UK Challenger Hop Pellets, 1oz

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/u...lets-1-oz.html

NB Amber Malt Syrup, 3LBS

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/n...alt-syrup.html

Wyeast Irish Ale

http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/w...irish-ale.html

Steeping/mashing the grains at 9qts of water at ~156 degrees Fahrenheit stable for 60 minutes

Sparging 170 degree water until target volume (5 gallons)

Once target volume is reached, add the extract and the entire oz of hops goes it at the start of the 60 minute boiling timer to get the perfect amount of bitterness. This isn't meant to be hoppy, I want the grains to "pop" more so than the hops. 18 IBU at the end of the day.

Last 10 minutes of the boil, add the bottle recommended about of Irish moss (totally adding it because it says Irish brah)

Cool the wort to pitch temp, move it over to fermenter and pitch yeast

Waiting Game

SRM is about 15, right in the middle of the target SRM

OG ought to be 1.053
FG ought to be 1.014
ABV ought to be ~5%

Questinos, commentos, concernos? Love to hear some feedback



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Old 10-28-2011, 03:06 PM   #2
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No love for the lady in red??


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Old 10-28-2011, 06:19 PM   #3
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20% (or more) crystal + a high mash temp + the lower end of IBU range = a sweet tasting beer. The Amber extract has additional crystal malt in it. If that is what you want, that is what this recipe will get you.

EDIT:

Just noticed that you're trying to steep a crap load of flaked oats as well. These need to be (mini) mashed with an equal portion of base malt to convert the starches.
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Old 10-28-2011, 06:46 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wonderbread23 View Post
20% (or more) crystal + a high mash temp + the lower end of IBU range = a sweet tasting beer. The Amber extract has additional crystal malt in it. If that is what you want, that is what this recipe will get you.

EDIT:

Just noticed that you're trying to steep a crap load of flaked oats as well. These need to be (mini) mashed with an equal portion of base malt to convert the starches.
The crystal malt In the amber should only effect color right?

I thought the heat is what concerted the oat starched into sugar.
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Old 10-28-2011, 07:05 PM   #5
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What is going to convert the oats? There are no base grains there.
Why oats in an Irish red?
Way too much crystal for my taste.
Where is the roasted barley that is usually used to give the red color for an Irish red?
1 oz Phoenix @ 60 minutes should give IBU's in the 40's (assuming 10%)
With no base malts, I think you will get an OG of < 1.040

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Old 10-28-2011, 07:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
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What is going to convert the oats? There are no base grains there.
Why oats in an Irish red?
Way too much crystal for my taste.
Where is the roasted barley that is usually used to give the red color for an Irish red?
1 oz Phoenix @ 60 minutes should give IBU's in the 40's (assuming 10%)
With no base malts, I think you will get an OG of < 1.040

-a.
I considered my base malt to be the Amber malt extract, I forgot that doesn't go into the mash though. I have about 4 lbs of 2 row barley, maybe I can use that?

I'm very into sweet, malty beers. I'm super picky about bitterness.

The breiss caramel give the red hue, it's 80L, didn't you click the links? =/

The oats are for creaminess and to make it heavier. I've read it's really common to use oats. This is going to be for winter drinking, so I figured go heavy with the oats.

The website I used to build the brew said @60 minutes (I have to substitute the phoenix with challenger because the site didn't have it) it would give 18ish IBUs
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Old 10-28-2011, 08:22 PM   #7
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EDITED RECIPE, very different
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Old 10-28-2011, 09:09 PM   #8
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I don't dispute that you will get a beer with approximately the color that you want, but I don't think it will taste anything like an Irish red. That's no problem if that's what you want, but you did say it was an Irish red.

From http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter12-2.html
Oatmeal 1 L Oats are wonderful in a porter or stout. Oatmeal lends a smooth, silky mouthfeel and a creaminess to a stout that must be tasted to be understood. Oats are available whole, steel-cut (i.e. grits), rolled, and flaked. Rolled and flaked oats have had their starches gelatinized (made soluble) by heat and pressure, and are most readily available as "Instant Oatmeal" in the grocery store. Whole oats and "Old Fashioned Rolled Oats" have not had the degree of gelatinization that Instant have had and must be cooked before adding to the mash. "Quick" oatmeal has had a degree of gelatinization but does benefit from being cooked before adding to the mash. Cook according to the directions on the box (but add more water) to ensure that the starches will be fully utilized. Use 0.5-1.5 lb. per 5 gal batch. Oats need to be mashed with barley malt (and its enzymes) for conversion.

From http://www.bjcp.org/styles04/Category9.php#style9D
Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium body, although examples containing low levels of diacetyl may have a slightly slick mouthfeel. Moderate carbonation. Smooth. Moderately attenuated (more so than Scottish ales). May have a slight alcohol warmth in stronger versions.
Overall Impression: An easy-drinking pint. Malt-focused with an initial sweetness and a roasted dryness in the finish.
Comments: Sometimes brewed as a lager (if so, generally will not exhibit a diacetyl character). When served too cold, the roasted character and bitterness may seem more elevated.
Ingredients: May contain some adjuncts (corn, rice, or sugar), although excessive adjunct use will harm the character of the beer. Generally has a bit of roasted barley to provide reddish color and dry roasted finish. UK/Irish malts, hops, yeast.



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Old 10-28-2011, 09:28 PM   #9
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Edited recipe looks much better.
I'd drop the cara pils, and reduce the crystal 80 to no more than 8 oz, then add a small amount of roasted barley (or even chocolate malt) to provide the required color and finish, then add a little more LME (or pale malt) to restore the OG to what you want.
(That's what I would do, not necessarily what you want.)

According to Promash (using Tinseth) 1 oz hops at 7% AA gives you about 30 IBU's with the adjusted recipe.

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Old 10-29-2011, 04:57 AM   #10
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Why would you drop carapils?

Thanks for all the help btw!

I'm trying to alter it to be more seasonal, I brew for me and tons of other people and I asked them what they wanted for this holiday season. The majority said a sweet beer. So I'm working on this and a cider just for the winter. Maybe that sets things straight


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