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Old 10-27-2011, 12:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
If the beer is done, and has been at FG for at least three days, yes.

But I normally leave my beer in primary 2 weeks and make sure it's perfectly clear before racking because I'm in no rush.
I always knew most ales would be completely fermented after a few days but I always thought the norm was at least 3 weeks, 4 if possible.

Now that I know as long as a good yeast count, healthy yeast and the right fermentation temp can ferment and clear a beer in 2 weeks, I will have a better pipeline lol

I think one of my bigger problems as to why I kept my beers in primary for at least 3 weeks (usually 4) is because I never make starters and just pitch the vial. There just haven't been enough yeast to ferment and clear the beer quick enough.

This is great news lol
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Old 10-27-2011, 12:50 AM   #12
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I don't get it.....the last 10000 posts I have seen said "4 weeks" and now this? what is the truth?

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:05 AM   #13
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This is the truth if you do everything right. 4 weeks is the truth if you don't.
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:08 AM   #14
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Quote:
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I don't get it.....the last 10000 posts I have seen said "4 weeks" and now this? what is the truth?
It's not that one of us is right and several of us are wrong. You certainly can leave the beer in the fermenter for a month, especially if you feel it needs the time to "clean up".

My position is simply that a well-made beer doesn't need any such amount of time and that a very verbal minority make it seem like it's the right thing to do. It's not. It might not hurt a thing, but it certainly isn't necessary.
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:18 AM   #15
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Quote:
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I don't get it.....the last 10000 posts I have seen said "4 weeks" and now this? what is the truth?
Try both, see which one you like to drink more. Repeat future brews with that method.
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:19 AM   #16
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The truth is found out by your own experimentation and arriving at what works best for you. I've left beers in primary for 5 days and 5 weeks. Some yeast drop out quickly (highly flocculating strains that I mentioned above) and I can move them to keg within 6 days. Others take more time (001/1056/S-05 is the most popular yeast strain by far, but in my hands, it takes a while to flocc out). Recently, on the same day, I brewed beers using 1728 and S-05 - I kegged the 1728 quick, but the S-05 is still in the fermentor because it took a couple more days to finish fermentation and hasn't flocced out enough for my tastes yet.

If you have off flavors or what-not, then perhaps time will help them mellow, but it's not always the case - time isn't going to heal everything despite what certain people want to tell you. A lot of people say that yeast need this time to "clean up off flavors from fermentation." This is crap advice, IMO. Most of these "off-flavors" shouldn't be there in the first place, so I suspect not enough yeast being pitched, or too warm a fermentation temperature. You may have some diacetyl with particular yeast strains (notably some English ones), but this should be metabolised within 48 hours at the latest.

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:21 AM   #17
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Quote:
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I don't get it.....the last 10000 posts I have seen said "4 weeks" and now this? what is the truth?
The truth is what works with your system, the yeast you use and the beer you brew. Gravity also plays a huge role,along with how careful you are about fermentation temperatures.

I started out with the 3 weeks minimum mindset and now, after experimentation and refining my process, I'm usually ready to bottle by day 10 (if not 7).

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:22 AM   #18
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hmmmmmmm time to start more experimentations!

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:26 AM   #19
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I'm of the camp that time does help mellow and clean things, but that's just my opinion. It's also my opinion that it doesn't matter if you let it mellow in the primary, a secondary, or in the bottle. I use a secondary, but that's just because that's what I was taught and I'm comfortable with it. I also have room for 3 carboys to condition.

But if you've hit your FG in your primary, you don't have to worry about bottle bombs. You can either go to a secondary or to the bottle, doesn't matter where you let it age.

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:26 AM   #20
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I haven't left a beer longer than 2 weeks for a long time and my beers keep getting better and better.
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