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Old 10-26-2011, 02:08 AM   #1
Perkt
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Sep 2011
Castle Rock, CO
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So things started off nice and easy with a kit, I then moved on to a seasonal beer recipe, and am now trying my hand at #3...

I've read through Papazian many times and am coming up with a question that I haven't been able to address through any number of podcasts or forums...I think I may be using a partial mash method, or I may just have been set astray from day 1 from using a kit.

Anyhow, what I did for the first brew was repeated for the second and is as follows:
(RDWHAHB)
Steep specialty grains for 45 minutes around 155, but not to exceed 170 (as to avoid leaching any tannins from the husk)
Remove the grains, bring to boil, add in the LME or DME and continue to boil with hop additions along the way, full boil for 1 hour
Drop temp using an ice bath until appropriate for pitching the yeast
Let set in the fermintor until you just can't wait any longer
Bottle, wait another two weeks..

Anyhow, Papazian is saying to boil everything together...extracts, grains, sugar additions, etc..

Any advice on the benefit of either method would be much appreciated!

 
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Old 10-26-2011, 02:17 AM   #2
iaefebs
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Can you quote where Papazian say's to boil the grains?

 
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Old 10-26-2011, 02:21 AM   #3
birvine
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Do not boil grains.

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Old 10-26-2011, 02:25 AM   #4
Perkt
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Sep 2011
Castle Rock, CO
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Where I'm reading is in the intermediate brewing chapter, page 46 in the 3rd edition, second paragraph after "Plus:..."

"From the above ingredients, you will prepare a wort...To make 5 gallons of beer, concentrated wort is prepared by combining malt extract with 2 gallons of water, any cracked grains, sugar and hops and boiling for 1/2 to 1 hour"
He goes on to transferring to the fermenter by saying "The hops and grains are then removed from the concentrated wort by passing the wort through a sanitized strainer and into the cold water in the fermenter".

Just want to be certain the method I've been using isn't off base, and that steeping and then removing the grains before bringing the kettle to a boil is not stealing any of the final glory from the beer!

 
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Old 10-26-2011, 02:25 AM   #5
iaefebs
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The closest thing I found was on page 51 of the third edition.

 
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Old 10-26-2011, 02:29 AM   #6
Gduck
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May 2011
Ithaca, NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Perkt View Post
Where I'm reading is in the intermediate brewing chapter, page 46 in the 3rd edition, second paragraph after "Plus:..."

"From the above ingredients, you will prepare a wort...To make 5 gallons of beer, concentrated wort is prepared by combining malt extract with 2 gallons of water, any cracked grains, sugar and hops and boiling for 1/2 to 1 hour"
He goes on to transferring to the fermenter by saying "The hops and grains are then removed from the concentrated wort by passing the wort through a sanitized strainer and into the cold water in the fermenter".

Just want to be certain the method I've been using isn't off base, and that steeping and then removing the grains before bringing the kettle to a boil is not stealing any of the final glory from the beer!
Your method is spot on. There is never any reason to boil your grains. None. Bad things will occur. You've been doing it right all along, so brew on!

 
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Old 10-27-2011, 04:13 AM   #7
Perkt
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Sep 2011
Castle Rock, CO
Posts: 29

Wow...

So there were a pair of firsts on this brew when it comes to yeast...

#1: Used a liquid yeast rather than the dry yeast I had been pitching.
#2: Created a starter that worked for 48 hours before being pitched.

Anyhow, it was a late start to the brew day (around 8:30pm) and concluded in the early morning (close to 1:30am). By the time I had gotten up to get ready for the day (6am, or 4.5 hours later) there was no evidence of fermentation...wouldn't really expect there to be. By 9am though...wow


I attached a blow-off tube and let the sucker go. Less than 8 hours to really get cookin' and here we are almost 24 hours later and it's still moving at a pretty good pace.

My question is this: Is the blow-off needed for most starters, or more so for larger batches, or both? This batch is coming out closer to 6 gallons, so the Carboy was a bit more full than the previous two batches, however I'm not certain it was necessary to do a yeast starter, as I've never had issues with fermentation, just more interested in learning more about the process and having more control over the finished product.

Also, the beer is a "Winter Warmer" and I believe (will verify the targets tomorrow) the gravity may be a bit larger with this brew, as the corrected OG was 1.052.

Any info on what lends to a more aggressive fermentation is appreciated, as this blew off my airlock and I'd like to know when a blow-off is called for and when the airlock is sufficient.
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Old 10-27-2011, 12:43 PM   #8
arch1tect
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Blow off tubes are needed if the vessel you're fermenting in isn't large enough. There is no set in stone rule when to use one. The carboy in your photo doesn't look like it's more than 6 gallons so you should always use a blow off for primary until it slows down a little.

I've had 7 gallon buckets that needed blow-off and 5 gallon carboys that haven't. So it's best just to use one at the start so you don't have a mess like that again.
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Old 10-27-2011, 12:52 PM   #9
unionrdr
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+1,I always use a blow off the first 3-4 days,maybe more till initial fermentation is over. They can be pretty wild. Once the brew slows down,I pull the blow off & install a sanitized airlock filled with cheap vodka.
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:00 PM   #10
yancydc
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Mar 2011
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After brewing for a year, I'm starting to find that the only time you need a blowoff tube is when you didn't use one! I've only had 2 beers come up into the airlock, and all the times when I used a blowoff tube, I had more gentle fermentation. Luckily nothing ended up in a carpet, yech.

 
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