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Old 10-21-2011, 01:17 PM   #11
prothumia
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My line is 5 ft long and 1/4" i.d. x 3/8" o.d. is marked on the side. I bought it at a homebrew store. The fridge is set at around 35 degrees. After the initial day at 35 psi, I've had it constantly on at 12 for about three weeks.
I was sure to check for leaks at the beginning and I purged the O2.

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 03:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by prothumia View Post
My line is 5 ft long and 1/4" i.d. x 3/8" o.d. is marked on the side. I bought it at a homebrew store. The fridge is set at around 35 degrees. After the initial day at 35 psi, I've had it constantly on at 12 for about three weeks.
I was sure to check for leaks at the beginning and I purged the O2.
In my opinion 5ft is too short especially for 1/4" id hose. You need something more like 8ft. 5ft will get you a rough and foamy pour at 12psi... that rough pour will leave your beer flat. That is probably your problem.

Additionally, leaving your beer at 35psi for a day may result in overcarbed beer. It's hard to say (and that's the problem with the high pressure force carb method - I prefer the "serving pressure+shaking" method). The fact that you later set it at 12psi and leave it there does nothing to solve an overcarb problem if you have one.

The problem is there are 2 reasons for foamy beer and they are not mutually exclusive.
1. line length is too short giving your serving pressure and line diameter.
2. beer is overcarbed.

You may have both going on but it's impossible to say because the overcarbed beer (if it is overcarbed) will be rendered flat by a rough pour which you no doubt have given your short line length.

I say start by getting a longer length of line and see if that resolves it. Start with 8ft minimum, maybe 9. You can always cut some off but you can't put it on. If the pour is too gentle then cut some off. But I'll bet 8ft is the sweet spot.

If the beer is still foamy after you get the line length right then you have it over carbed and you need to rethink your force carb method. Again, in my experience the high pressure method is imprecise and a total gamble.

If you must force carb then do the following:
1. get the beer at serving temperature
2. attach gas line. It works best if you attach it to the beer diptube.. i.e. put a black beer disconnect on your hose line and snap it to the 'out' post on the keg. This way the gas bubbles up through the beer as you shake.. it expedites the process. You don't have to do it this way though, but it helps. Do be careful though to not set pressure in the regulator below pressure in the keg or you will backflow beer into the regulator which will be bad!
3. set regulator at desired serving pressure (e.g. 12 psi)
4. shake the heck out of the keg until the gas stops flowing into it.
5. let beer sit at least overnight before serving to allow the foam to settle.
6. attach gas to gas post and attach beer line to beer post.
7. drink up.

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 04:56 PM   #13
Hang Glider
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standard beer line for home use is 3/16". 1/4" line has to be balanced and is used for longer runs...

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 05:26 PM   #14
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It's not a matter of opinion. 5 feet of 1/4" ID line is too large in diameter and/or too short. Replace it with 8 feet of 3/16" ID tubing. It's a shame that homebrew shops sell products that they know too little about.

Among all the different ways to hurry up and carb a beer, shaking the keg at elevated pressures is by far the worst and most unpredictable method. If this was the advice you gleaned from HBT, you're looking at the wrong threads. If anything, at least stick to the 30 psi for 2 days method without the shaking.
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Old 10-21-2011, 05:36 PM   #15
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Do you use keg lube. My keg had the same issue. I bought some keg lube and lubed the ring. Bam instant fix. I forced carb at 20 psi shake n bake. No issues since using keg lube.
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Old 10-21-2011, 05:47 PM   #16
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I am a new kegger and I will be starting out using 3 gallon kegs. Do the pressure and line length rules still apply to a 3gallon vs 5 gallon keg?

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:00 PM   #17
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yes.




.

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:32 PM   #18
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Im a new kegger, I have 5 ft of 3/16 and I do 30psi for 24 hours and then set to desired serving pressure and leave it for a week.
no problems so far.

 
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Old 10-21-2011, 06:40 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petho View Post
I am a new kegger and I will be starting out using 3 gallon kegs. Do the pressure and line length rules still apply to a 3gallon vs 5 gallon keg?
Yep!


I'd suggest starting with 10 feet of 3/16" line. That will work fine, but the pour may be a little slow. If you want, you could do a couple of kegs and if the pour is too slow, you can just cut a foot off the line.

I think on this forum, ONE person didn't like the 10' lines due to a slow pour. Remember that you can always make them shorter but you can't make them longer!
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Old 10-27-2011, 01:41 PM   #20
prothumia
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Jul 2011
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Thanks a lot. I'm going to replace the tubing and see if it resolves it. I surely don't mind a slow pour...I just want bubbly brew!

 
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