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Old 10-06-2011, 02:59 AM   #1
ultravista
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Mar 2007
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I cannot pinpoint the recurring taste in my beer but is always there.

Regardless of equipment, all grain, partial grain, or extract, yeast strain, filtered, bottled, or unfiltered water, kegged or bottled - there's an underlying taste that is present. Not necessarily bad, but there.

For example. I brewed an all grain version of Dog Fish Head's Indian Brown Ale with Ringwood yeast. The taste was there.

I brewed Yoopers all grain Dead Guy Clone and a Brewcraft Dead Guy kit with Pacman yeast. The taste was there.

The taste was there before using a plate chiller and it's there now.

I've fermented at 70 degrees and now ferment at 60 degrees in a refrigerator, still, the same underlying taste.

The only real common denominator is StarSan and the glass carboys I ferment in. I don't leave StarSan in the fermenter, all but a little foam.

I filter my water through a $30 charcol filter, the type of filter many use to filter the whole house water. But I have also used bottled water and I can detect the same taste.

It's driving me crazy, trying to figure out what it could be.

My uneducated guess is that it must be the taste of yeast. Althought it doesn't taste "yeasty" if that makes sense.

I haven't tasted another homebrewers beer so I have nothing else to base it on.

Any ideas?



 
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:07 AM   #2
two_hearted
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Can you describe the taste more?



 
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:16 AM   #3
HollisBrewCo
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If the only common denominator you can think of is starsan why don't you try a batch with iodiphor (sp ?) To eliminate that possibility.
More information on the off flavor would be helpful indeed.
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:26 AM   #4
jiggs_casey
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My 'shot in the dark' answer would be to ask how you prepare your beer for bottling vs. kegging. Do you use dextrose in both?

The reason I ask is I always have this 'flavor' in my beers. It is certainly not unpleasant but it is there. I also always prepare for bottling using dextrose. I will be kegging soon and am looking forward to not using dextrose just to see if it changes the taste...
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:28 AM   #5
runningweird
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when I first started i made beer that was good, but still had that "home made" taste vs. commercially/professionally made. the things that fixed it were as follows:
1. pitch a viable amount of yeast
2. aerate/oxegenate
3. Ferment at proper temperature

what are you boiling your wort in? could something be leeching into the beer?

 
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:29 AM   #6
Beezy
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I am no expert but maybe it's something in your water? What is the water situation? I can taste the yeast in my beer but it is different for each strain or even fermentation temperatures. I am sure it's not that. I use tons of starsan that never put any off flavors in my beer.

 
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:31 AM   #7
Beezy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jiggs_casey View Post
My 'shot in the dark' answer would be to ask how you prepare your beer for bottling vs. kegging. Do you use dextrose in both?

The reason I ask is I always have this 'flavor' in my beers. It is certainly not unpleasant but it is there. I also always prepare for bottling using dextrose. I will be kegging soon and am looking forward to not using dextrose just to see if it changes the taste...
I went from corn sugar to cane sugar and I can't tell any difference in fact it carbs up just as quick contrary to what I have read. Needless to say I haven't gone back because priming sugar is much more expensive.

 
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Old 10-06-2011, 03:33 AM   #8
seabass07
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For me, the reoccurring flavor was from esters. Changing from shaking to the venturi method of aeration made the flavor go away.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:09 AM   #9
ultravista
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The "taste" is hard to describe, to my palate, it appears to be more pronounced when the beer is warmer and I can certainly taste it when I burp. Maybe slightly bitter but not overpowering in any way. Something I can detect but others can't.

What taste is typically associated when burping?

I have never tasted this in commercial beers.

I do not use dextrose and only prime when bottling; the common taste is there when kegged too.

All of my beers now are fermented with starters but it was there before starters.

My beers are clear and carbonated well.

I cannot taste anything like it until post fermentation.

It was there before I started aerating with an .02 micro stone and pure O2.

What does an ester taste like?

Again, it is not a bad taste per se, just something that I cannot pinpoint or describe.

The commonality is water but I have tried bottled water too.

Wouldn't a water filter like the one below cut the "city water" taste out?



What taste does Chlorine or Chloramide contribute?

It is not oxidized either. Fermentation is in a refrigerator and direct to keg.

 
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Old 10-06-2011, 07:38 AM   #10
944play
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ultravista View Post
What taste is typically associated when burping?
Chlorophenol, but it's pretty distinctly Band-Aid. Also, if you're carbon-filtering your water, that should remove most of the chlorine or chloramine (if you're filtering slow enough).


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