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Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Wine Making Forum > 막걸리 "Makgeolli"
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Old 12-21-2011, 04:04 AM   #31
SteveHoward
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In an earlier post, I was unable to remember if I ever saw it written in English. In your picture, there's no doubt it's romanized (although in small print below the Hangul). I don't think I've ever seen that variety before. I was going to ask you where you found it, but I see you got it to take home from the party .

I'm interested to see how it goes for you. Please let us know.


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Old 12-21-2011, 04:44 AM   #32
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Since that is romanized, it gives me a chance to explain something. You will see it romanized differently, and spelled slightly differently. I first started learning to read and write Korean in 1984, and when I was taught, there was a very rigid system that was used for transliteration. Some people still use this, but sometimes, it really doesn't make sense phonetically. Sometimes, none of the systems that are used really make sense phonetically. (An example is the Korean surname: Choi. Whenever an English speaker sees that, they want to pronounce it like "Choy," but the Korean dipthong that is transliterated "oi" actually makes a sound similar to a short "e." So that baseball player Hee Sop Choi ... that last name should sound more like "cheh.")

Hangul is the Korean alphabet, and it is an alphabet - different from the Japanese syllabary or the Chinese character based system (which is also used in other countries in one form or another). So in Hangul, it is written:

막걸리
Each character grouping is one syllable. You can see the Hangul on the bottle, but it is a calligraphy style, so if you're not accustomed to seeing it, it may be difficult. The spellings come about from this if you follow the groupings:

ㅁ is equivalent to the English 'M'

ㅏ sounds like "ah" in English (There are more vowels in Korean than in English, and unlike English, a vowel in Korean has only one sound.)

ㄱ you see this at the end of the first syllable (on the bottom), and again at the beginning of the second syllable (upper left character in that syllable). It makes a sound somewhere between the English G and K. Often, it is romanized as a G at the beginning of a syllable, and as a K at the end of a syllable. In the spelling on your bottle, they just used a double 'K' which would not be incorrect. I don't normally do it that way though, just because the old style of G and K makes a clearer distinction between this letter and another Korean letter that used to be romanized as K' (with an apostrophe) which was used for another Korean letter with a harder 'K' sound.

ㅓ is about halfway between the English sounds ooh and uh. In words like "Seoul" it is romanized as "eo," but other times, it is romanized just as o. Even though it doesn't sound like "eo" I usually romanize it this way because it avoids confusion with another Korean letter which makes a long 'o' sound. At the time I learned it, it was almost always romanized as "eo."

ㄹ is very hard to describe. It is neither an r, nor an l sound, but actually is between those two sounds. It is pretty close to the Spanish 'r' sound. You see this letter as the end of the second syllable (scrunched down at the bottom), and the beginning of the third syllable (stretched up on the left). Doubling consenants in Korean really means you hold that sound longer, so when I romanize, I will always keep the double consonant like in this case, but in some more modern methods of romanizing, it's not always done - thus the spelling on the bottle.

ㅣis maybe between a short i and long e, but I think it is closest to a long 'e' sound in English, but it is almost always romanized as 'i'. I think this was probably done because this vowel often appears at the end of a syllable, and if it was romanized as 'e', English speakers might assume it to be a silent 'e' and try to apply English pronunciation rules.

Some Korean words are well established in their English spelling and always appear the same. The capital city of 서울, (pronounced as suh-ool) is one such word and is always romanized as "Seoul." Other words such as 막걸리 (the drink we're talking about) are not so well established, so there are many ways they are romanized, and it probably depends on the age of the person romanizing it how likely it is to be spelled one way vs. another. So far as this goes, my wife's hometown of "Pusan" is often romanized as "Busan" these days.

To tell you the truth, it's probably easier to learn to read the Korean alphabet than it is to try to explain why things are romanized a certain way .


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Old 12-21-2011, 05:55 AM   #33
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Still have not started my batch, ran out of cash for rice after the wife went Christmas shopping. Trying to find the proper rice in bulk in case my reduced amount of nuruk screws things up.
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Old 12-10-2014, 04:40 PM   #34
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My first experience with the stuff was in Korea in the late 70's. Mamasan brewed it outdoors in a huge crock. The stuff I was drinking was about a year old and man. What a hangover!
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Old 04-18-2015, 07:47 PM   #35
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Hope some one is still active from this post! Thinking about brewing some Makgeoli for my daughter's upcoming baek-il. Sorry if this is a silly question, I've only brewed one batch of beer so far. Instead of bottling could this be kegged?
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Old 04-18-2015, 07:57 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kadiya View Post
Hope some one is still active from this post! Thinking about brewing some Makgeoli for my daughter's upcoming baek-il. Sorry if this is a silly question, I've only brewed one batch of beer so far. Instead of bottling could this be kegged?

Yes. But keep it in the keezer when it done. It'll continue to ferment. Vent it every one in a while.
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Old 04-18-2015, 08:29 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kadiya View Post
Hope some one is still active from this post! Thinking about brewing some Makgeoli for my daughter's upcoming baek-il. Sorry if this is a silly question, I've only brewed one batch of beer so far. Instead of bottling could this be kegged?

Yes. But keep it in the keezer when it done. It'll continue to ferment. Vent it every one in a while.
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Old 04-20-2015, 12:49 AM   #38
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Oh awesome! Thank you for responding! Actually I have a kegerator. Last questions, won't I have to shake it up prior to dispensing from the tap then since it separates? Also did you happen to try it with any of the fruits or other ideas mentioned?
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Old 04-20-2015, 01:30 AM   #39
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Don't see any reason why it can't be kegged, just make sure to drink it a lot fresher than you would beer because there's no hops to preserve it and keep the carbonation low.

Or at least that's what I THINK you should do based on drinking a lot of makkeoli and brewing zero of it
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:04 AM   #40
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Interesting that long after I've stopped actively participating in this forum that the two makgeolli threads (this one, and one where someone else referenced this) have come active and sent me emails .

First of all, Kadiya, congratulations on the baby, and congratulations on making it to 100 days. Now, if your celebrating Baek-il, I'm sure there is a Korean connection there somewhere. Is it you? (You don't have to answer that if you consider it private.)

In answer to your question: I'm not sure I would try to keg it just because of 1) the sediment you want to mix prior to drinking and 2) You usually want to drink it quickly while it is still alive and active (or at least I do - I don't think it keeps very well). I'm not sure how you'd handle the sediment in a keg, nor what you would do if there is still some carbonation building up.

What I did when I made it to be consumed quickly was put it in 2 liter plastic soda bottles, and maybe not tighten the lids completely. My friends here who make makgeolli or dong-dong-ju usually do this when they send some home with me. I usually drink it within a week as it degrades quickly after a couple of weeks. The plastic bottles are how it is given away, but if you have the equipment, storing it in a pot or crock is the way it was done traditionally, I think.

The reason I'm not active on this forum anymore is that I moved back to Korea, and am a very happy expat in Busan these days. I don't make wine or anything like that here. In Korea, you can buy the bottled makgeolli in the stores like you can get in the Korean markets in the US, and it is really no better here than there. But ... we have makgeolli houses that make their own, and we have friends who still make makgeolli and dong-dong-ju, and THAT is some GOOD stuff!

Anyway, congratulations! I hope you have a great celebration. This is my opinion on how I would store it, and that is really based on how I see it done here in Korea by people who still make their own - I have never tried to keg makgeolli. If you have a question, feel free to write it here. Even though I'm not active here anymore, I still get emails on this thread. I'm not truly expert, but I have friends who are, and if I am not on a business trip at the time, I'll try to ask the friends who are expert.


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